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Breaking Bad Watch: The Iceman Cometh

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Ursula Coyote/AMC

“It can’t all be for nothing.”

I have no secret knowledge of how Vince Gilligan and Breaking Bad’s writers plotted how to finish Walter White’s story, but I have to wonder if the scenario we saw tonight was considered, at one point, as the end. Walt isolated, thousands of miles from home, dying alone, knowing that everything has gone wrong, knowing that his child hates him, knowing that his plan to enrich his family has failed — and powerless to do anything but, wait, and know, and think on what he has done.

It feels in a sense as if these past few weeks have tried on several alternative endings for the story of Walter White. His surrender to Hank in the desert, as I said then, was one way it could have gone down. His disappearance into the horizon, last seen in the rear-view mirror of Vacuum Guy’s minivan, was another. (Hell, the end of last season’s run — Walt retired, successful, free and in the bosom of his family was, before Hank found Leaves of Grass as bathroom reading, the end for a very dark, cynical version of Breaking Bad.)

The Shield’s outstanding finale left its antihero-villain, Vic Mackey, alive and chained to a desk, presumably to ponder his crimes forever. Walt’s exile in “Granite State” might be considered The Shield alternative for Breaking Bad — letting Walt “escape,” but in such as way as to be tortured by his deeds for the rest of his short life. So his world ends, as another New Hampshire resident posited, not in fire but in ice.

There’s something purgatorial about Walt’s New Hampshire; we’ve spent so much time in the red-and-brown sunbaked vistas of New Mexico that emerging from the propane tank into New Hampshire feels like entering another world. As Vacuum Cleaner Guy — played, in an in-retrospect obvious bit of genius casting, by Robert Forster — says, it’s the kind of place where Walt could rest and get some much needed thinking done. “If you look around,” he says, “it’s kind of beautiful.”

But our Walt is not so easily going to slip into a contemplative mood. On the way to his New England getaway, he’s still nursing the idea that he can Heisenberg his way out of it again. He rants to Saul — like Hitler in the bunker in those “Downfall” videos — that he is not done: “My money goes to my children. Not just this barrel, but all of it!” And no sooner does Vacuum Cleaner drive down the road than he stuffs his pockets with money and dons the black hat–shot from behind, like a ceremonial crowning — ready to walk the eight miles to town and —

And what? He has, he sees, run out of practical options. “Tomorrow,” he tells himself. He retreats, takes off the hat, seems to give up and wait to die.

And yet in the end he can’t. In part, maybe, because he knows that once Vacuum Cleaner’s ministrations are done and he is dead to cancer, his friend-for-hire will Hoover up his barrel of money and be gone. In part, because his last phone call to Skyler was not quite as brilliant a ruse as he hoped. In part, maybe, because the prideful Heisenberg is still within him, as he sees Elliott and Gretchen denigrate his existence and his meaning to Gray Matter on Charlie Rose — he sees himself being erased from significance. Ready for a moment, after Walt Jr’s rejection, to turn himself in, he instead finds that burning anger relit, and he hits the road.

Because there is still too much to reckon with for Breaking Bad to end things this way. There is a vast and still-growing catalog of people whose lives Walt has ruined or ended, directly or indirectly. There’s Skyler, ruined, terrorized, and facing jail; Marie mourning; Junior bitter and angry. There’s Jesse captive in his meth dungeon and Andrea now, dead from the hell Walt unleashed by summoning the demons of Todd and Uncle Jack. As the suffering rolls out in this bleak, bleak episode, you can almost see the paper being crumpled up on the “Walt dies alone in hiding” idea and thrown into the wastebasket. Breaking Bad is not an elliptical show, and these things must be confronted.

Gilligan and company have created an amazing run of seven episodes leading up to next week’s finale; and yet they’ve still posed themselves a challenge in pulling off a satisfying ending. I’d now guess that the finale is building toward what it’s looked like: some revenge plot against Jack and company, abetted by Jesse (who now has a reason powerful enough to ally even with Walt), then freeing up Walt and Jesse for some final, cathartic confrontation. (Though what do I know? Is Walt carrying a machine gun for Gretchen and Elliott too?) He offered his son his money and was rejected. He has nothing to give anyone anymore but his freedom, or his life.

If you accept the premise that Walt was once at least mostly a good man — he really meant well, he truly loved his family, and so on — and that he became bad, indeed evil, through a series of gradual moral compromises, then you can see Gilligan’s dilemma in crafting the ending. How do you honor the good in Walt (or once in him) while punishing (or at least not excusing) the evil in him? Well, one way you do that, of course, is to give him a nemesis even more despicable and utterly hateful than himself: the sweet sociopathic Todd on the one hand, and actual Nazis on the other.

The trick, then, is to bring all this to a satisfying, cathartic climax without seeming to engineer Walt back into a good guy simply by giving him a bigger bad guy to fight. And you want — at least I want — the unrelenting suffering we’re seeing to end, or at least to see some sign of hope. (At this point in the series, most everyone we’ve come to care about in any way has been put into misery that shows no sign of ending, or is simply dead — and ugh, I can’t stand to think of Brock inside his house with his mom shot dead on the front lawn.) But you don’t want a happy ending — or let’s be realistic, a not-unrelentingly-miserable ending — to come at the expense of writing off the immense moral debt Walter White has rung up in this series.

At this point, I can only have the faith earned though four-and-a-half fantastic seasons of this series (recognized by an overdue Best Drama Emmy last night). We’ve seen Vince Gilligan run through several could-have-been endings for Walter White. Next week, we get the real one. Walt, and this story, are on the move, and this time it’s a one-way trip.

Now for the hail of bullets:

* I’m fascinated by the comparison of Lydia and Walt, two civilians who have descended into drug evil one step of moral compromise at a time. Where Walt acts out of hubris and pride, she acts out of caution and calculation. She doesn’t want to take any risks and she doesn’t want to see the consequences of her actions; and the two put together make her absolutely chilling, ordering brutal acts from a shelter of distance and euphemism. (Like Walt too, she justifies her deeds in the name of her family.) So she initially, coldly insists that Todd kill Skyler — a mother like herself — because she can’t be exposed to the slightest risk, and tells Todd this like she’s giving orders to the exterminator. I’d be fascinated to see what a Breaking Bad that was centered on Lydia would look like.

* On a lighter note, glad she finally got her chamomile tea! I’m guessing unlike with Mike, she picked the meeting place this time. (Todd, you are no Mike Ehrmentraut!)

* Honestly, the idea of punishing Walt with a lifetime of watching Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium does sound like a pretty heavy punishment.

* Speaking of which, the 2007 date of that movie reminds us that Walt arrives in New Hampshire just a couple years too late to run into The Sopranos’ Gay Vito.

* This week in probably-unfortunate product placements: Ensure, Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. (Meth Nazis love it!)

* It’s interesting that an episode that ended with one emotionally wrenching phone call should be followed by another — this one not a ruse, but devastatingly open and honest. [Update: Another parallel/inversion — at the end of "Ozymandias" we saw Walt controlling Heisenberg, using his villainous persona to try to exonerate Skyler. At the end of "Granite State," we saw Walt--the part of him still able to be moved to surrender by his son's repudiation--losing control to Heisenberg and his injured pride after seeing the Charlie Rose interview.]

* “Go ahead, do it! There’s no way I’m doing one more cook for you psycho fucks!” Oh, Jesse, poor Jesse. We’ve been talking a lot about what kind of ending we want for Walt. What do you want for Jesse?

133 comments
OnTheOtherHand
OnTheOtherHand

Endings should be ironic and somewhat symmetric.  How about if Walter Jr. becomes addicted to his father's meth?

TimePoster
TimePoster

In addition to the Shakespearean references this season, it seems that like Dante's Inferno, ironic, hellish punishment is meted out to sinners on the show, without exception or consideration for how otherwise like-able or repentant they are.


It's simple cosmic math or "karma," if you like. I believe this is why we see poor Jesse suffer so terribly despite his relatively "moral" character and good heart. The bottom line is that he has committed numerous egregious acts (or contributed to them), and the universe is doling out blind justice.

Other references to Inferno, include Walt's trip to a land of ice (the 9th and final circle of Hell reserved for Traitors, The Fraudulent etc.), and perhaps even Saul and Forster (the disappear-er) acting as the guide and voice of reason, Virgil, to Walt's Dante.

And yes, I can only imagine that watching a movie like Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium (2 copies!) would be hell for a guy like Walt!

DebraJeanTw
DebraJeanTw

Thank you for a well thought out review of my favorite TV show, EVER. Television lacks this kind of writing and I hope Vince Gilligan has another project coming soo.

MCWTAMPA
MCWTAMPA

My take on what the final episode might contain :

Walt heads back to Albq, goes to DEA and points them in the direction of the Aryans (who are now making the Heisenberg-quality blue ice), and has them take the fall for the entire blue meth empire, the deaths of Gomie and Hank etc, which all this time has been masterminded and bankrolled by Gretchen and Elliot. Sweet revenge. He still has his one barrel of money, but no family, sadly. Convinces cops that Jesse was forced into the operation and Jesse gets let off in exchange for his testimony against the Aryans.

So much looking forward to seeing how "Felina" actually airs. BTW, swap some letters around, and you get "Finale"....

LOVE the series and will be SO SAD to see it end. Congrats to all the actors, writers & crew. Amazing work that you can all be very proud of. Hard to top this on your resumes! 

JSGSC
JSGSC

My predictions for finale:

1. Walt tracks Todd and is able to catch Uncle Jack, Todd and crew by surprise.  He uses the threat of his super-gun to  load them into Jesse's prison and free Jesse.  He leaves Jesse there to watch over them.

2.  He makes a deal with Elliott and Gretchen.  He does a public tell-all to clear the company name, and they pay his share of the company to Skylar.

3.  Walt gets his 15 minutes of fame by telling-all on Charlie Rose's show.  He takes credit for Grey Matter's success, clears Skylar, Elliott and Gretchen of any meth wrong-doing, donates the 7 barrels of money to meth drug rehab, blames himself for all of his evils, announces where the Nazis are and that they killed Hank/Gomes, and takes the Ricin pill on-camera as his final punishment. 

4.  Walt dies 2 days later, his way, famous, his accomplishments known, duly punished.  Jesse gladly goes to prison to pay for his sins.  Uncle Jack, Todd and crew go to prison.  Elliott and Gretchen live happily ever after.  Sklyar and Flynn start their way back to normal, and have the Grey Matter money, legit and what Walt wanted from the start. 

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

Final scene:

EXTERIOR: Dark. Two figures, a man and a woman walking in the fog on an airport runway to a private jet.

LYDIA: Jesse, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

JESSE: Bitch, whatever.

FADE TO BLACK

PhillyCannabis
PhillyCannabis

I want Walt to kill them all. Including Jesse. Take his money. ALL of it and his family and move to south america with the help of Vacuum cleaner guy.

LanceRomance81
LanceRomance81

I believe Jesse will come full circle if he survives. From the small-time meth peddler Cap'n Cook, and finally replacing Walt at the top of the food chain once he is gone. Jesse seems too emotionally damaged to turn back now. I believe this will fortify him as a drug kingpin now, much in the same way Gus was hardened by Don Julio.

Lollo
Lollo

I think Walt will turn himself in after he killed the nazis and freed jesse. Just the moment before he walks into the police office he will take the Ricin so he can die soon after the confession which sets the white family free form all allegations.

heymanhn
heymanhn

I think the worst consequence for Walt would not be to die. Instead, it would be to serve a life sentence in jail while having lost his entire family. His death just won't do his evil deeds enough justice.

jasonbelltower
jasonbelltower

Walt is not going to run the risk of his money not going to his family. He's going back to get it. Likely will kill the bad guys. Jesse will get kill Todd. Walt and Jesse might kill each other.

AxlVanGok
AxlVanGok

Jesse > Alaska. 

... which is kinda like Walt's cabin. The last place Walt wants to be. The kinda place Jesse wants to be.

acen1999
acen1999

The cabin is totally purgatorial. And the vacuum guy's question "If I said yes, would you believe me" is rhetorical in this vein. He is Walt's intellectual match (if not some sort of guardian angel) and he avoids Walt's attempt to force him to reveal a morality. He has none, he is on another plane as far as Walt is concerned, and thus he turns the question right back, essentially saying "What do you believe in Mr. White?". While disheartening for Walt in the moment, it is actually the point where he realizes he is still free to decide. It is one last breath of life, a gift from the universe. Live free or die. 

DeanMoxon
DeanMoxon

walt is gunning for gretchen and the truth buried therein . she is the bitch we hear about when the word BITCH is used so so many times on the show. this unreleased truth is the source of walt's cancer. this is  WW's reason for everything he is doing.

Cat15
Cat15

I think that perhaps Skyler will tell the DEA about Lydia, and she'll go to prison. I know the Nazis threatened her but I think perhaps that will backfire. I can't see the White family getting out of this alive though, I think Walt will lose literally everything including his family, and be left in the ruins of his life, before he finally dies. The gun is for the Nazi's though, I see a big shoot out on the horizon. Perhaps Walt will kill himself too, upon realizing he has nothing left. I'd like for Jesse to end up with money, and for Brock to get some too. 

GregGallacci
GregGallacci

Lydia has associates in the Czech Republic.  Dangerous ones.

She refers to 'moving parts', those could be Czech/Russian mob figures.

If she rejects Todd and his affections, his reaction could be to stop cooking, or in some way stop the product from flowing.

Out-of-towners show up to keep product flowing, take out Todd and crew, keep Jess cooking.

From there??????

cthom2384
cthom2384

What if Mr. Lambert collects his nearly 80 million dollars from the Nazis and becomes the majority stock holder for gray matter? Of course after he poisons his former colleagues with the ricin. This is a solution that may solve the money laundering issue and since the company has wiped their hands clean from Walt, what connections to the crimes could there be. Walt dies in the arms of his wife, and leaves her with the fortune that should have legitimately been his since the beginning. I'm not saying the ending will be happy, but there has to be some form of redemption. As for Jesse and Walt, good luck trying to figure that out (Walt cares about his families future, not Jesse)

MichaelSantell
MichaelSantell

anybody who thinks Walt wants to save Jesse is nutz  ... . Walt blames Jesse as much as Jack for the murder of Hank . . .tho if Walt tangles with the Nazis it will involve Jesse bringing on probably final confrontation between Walt and Jesse . . . . on the other hand as this show is very grim and realistic the Nazis could parry Walt's attack and Walt and Jesse both get a bullet in the head like Hank did, since Todd is getting to where he doesn't need either of them for cooking lessons . . . the other scenario is Walt goes completely Heisenberg, settles all scores including with his former partners (and mistress), then offs himself with the ricin pill now that his family is destroyed

Sinisterwaltz
Sinisterwaltz

"Jesse, I am your father"-Walt.  And scene. 

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

Excuse me, North Korea. I said North Vietnam.

late

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

Kim Jong Ung is a real life player -- and he's slinging ice. He's ordered his mad scientists to start cooking in a lab so posh it looks like a food court with vats. I saw the pics of his meth on Fox. It's not blue. It's spectral, like the light reflected from a diamond.

Homie, look it up. Bitch, Ung, shot a porno movie with about ten hot, skinny, North Vietnamese babes, including, I think, his girlfriend. Dude didn't like how the movie came out and had all the actors shot; dead. With guns. Man, that's strict.

 The commentary on Fox' The Five was Ung's new hobby will help his people to keep from eating: there's no food in North Vietnam. However, El Presidente's three million man army may suffer. If they are tweaking they will start taking things apart, thereby destroying their weapons.

out


d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

If you only have two hours, shows, to end the best ride of our lives, what is this Walden Pond? The cabin in the snow eats minutes. Heck, it takes a couple of minutes for Walter to go wheezing to his front gate. The trade of Walt stoking his stove with wood kindling and the time that could have been spent in the violent settling of scores is wasteful.

Our boys and girls threw away a lot of minutes in Granite State. With a show this huge, they should have taken another season to close it down if they do stuff like pause to reflect on Walden.

They need at least two hours after this Granite State bomb to close things properly.

I have Lydia wiping out the Nazis and walking off into the fog with her new partners Walt and Jesse, repeating the great closing lines from Casablanca. You know the ones, Sam.

Breaking -- Fox is reporting Kim Jung Ung of North Korea is having his scientists making 100 percent meth for sale worldwide. I wonder what show he has been watching?

out

theemptycross07
theemptycross07

hahaha for this episode  I was mostly waiting to see who wrote Heisenberg on the wall of Walt's house, thinking it might be Marie or even Walt Jr/Finn . . . turns out it was just some random teenage hijinks after the bank forced the last of the family out and the bank puts up the fence to prevent further vandalism as they put the house up for auction. Nice red herring, the house looking much more destroyed than that when Walt goes in for the ricin, like the Nazis had attacked it or something

theemptycross07
theemptycross07

hahaha for this episode  I was mostly waiting to see who wrote Heisenberg on the wall of Walt's house, thinking it might be Marie or even Walt Jr/Finn . . . turns out it was just some random teenagers after the bank forced the last of the family out and the bank puts up the fence to prevent further vandalism as they put the house up for auction.

SaintRico
SaintRico

Another unfortunate product placement you missed: Rudys BBQ. That's what Todd is munching on as he shows no emotion at Jesse calling him a "that Opiedead-eyed piece of sh**."

EmAnnett
EmAnnett

I'd LOVE to see Jesse get away and somehow have a life, but I don't see it as a possibility. He has been destroyed. Even if he were to survive, he could never recover. He couldn't live with the guilt the way that Walt did. That's why Jesse is the 'moral' center. 

Some consider Jesse going to Hank a betrayal on Jesse's part, but that is the criminal's point of view, looking at Jesse through Heisenburg's eyes. Our identification with Walt and a sort of 'emotional bonding' makes us have blinders on, and I think the show set us up in that way. People at different times say "I can't root for him anymore" etc., but it is amazing how much we STILL are looking to find the good in him. The 'he's really a nice guy.' Yet you can't say he is all good or all bad. He was willing to give up the money for Hank-but then betrays Jesse by not only okaying his death, and TORTURE, but by the cruelty of telling Jesse about Jane. That was nothing but spite. But under it all I always feel Walt feels like he is little and helpless, and the Heisenburg is his way of compensating.

In the flashback scene where he talks to Skyler on the phone, we saw something we never saw at all in that first seaon. He and Skyler showing affection for each other, a real relationship. When she said "Hey, You" it was heartbreaking, because now we know there were good things in that relationship, and that, had Walt not 'broken bad', he and the family could have had some quality time together.....So many times along the way he could have stopped, but didn't. And here we go at the end-looks like he will stay true to form.

EmAnnett
EmAnnett

I really liked this episode, it felt very sad, but it felt right to spend time with Walt, as he became sicker-as he lost the last of his ability to bully and intimidate people (Saul). To me his enjoyment of intimidating Saul that first time he pushed him up against the wall in Saul's office was one of the worst aspects of his character, one of the most chilling. That and when he was in the car with Jesse and Mike and said "Because I Said So". The essence of abuse and need to control.  From the beginning his demeaning, putting down, and bullying Jesse was a really BAD BAD sign too. He had to make someone else feel bad so he's feel better about himself I guess.


pjm1219
pjm1219

Cabin has two copies of Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium on DVD.

Check out this quote from that movie:

Mr. Edward Magorium: “When King Lear dies in Act V, do you know what Shakespeare has written? He’s written ‘He dies.’ That’s all, nothing more. No fanfare, no metaphor, no brilliant final words. The culmination of the most influential work of dramatic literature is ‘He dies.’ It takes Shakespeare, a genius, to come up with “He dies.” And yet every time I read those two words, I find myself overwhelmed with dysphoria. And I know it’s only natural to be sad, but not because of the words ‘He dies.’ but because of the life we saw prior to the words. I’ve lived all five of my acts, Mahoney, and I am not asking you to be happy that I must go. I’m only asking that you turn the page, continue reading… and let the next story begin. And if anyone asks what became of me, you relate my life in all its wonder, and end it with a simple and modest ‘He died.’”

Nuts
Nuts

The show could end as it began, with Walt and Jesse cooking together.


Difficult to say, although the possibility of Walt and Jesse banding together to defeat Uncle Jack and his crew seems likely.


Although I can't help thinking that Walt may be brought down by a character we would least expect.


Something or someone from Walt's past, is going to be his downfall.


How about this "Wizard of Oz" scenario: All of this was a dream that Walt had during chemo. He wakes up with his family all around him.

pkilly
pkilly

How do you honor the good in Walt (or once in him) while punishing (or at least not excusing) the evil in him?


In Ozymandias the good was honored by Walt offering all 80 million just so Hank wouldn't die, even as he was ruthlessly hunting him down, the punishment? It didn't work out too well did it, remember him falling to the ground, powerless, devastated?

DennisFlynnIII
DennisFlynnIII

I think that Walt will ambush the Nazis with the M-60, come across Jesse & free him,, all the while all the nazis are dead except Todd who is heavily wounded trying to crawl away while Jesse runs up to him and chokes him to death or something like that, real personal. Anyways....with Walt's family hating him, him never being able to give his money to them & saying all along that "this all can't be for nothing" he is going to forgive Jesse & realize Jesse is his family, was like a son to him & that before Walt dies (of his cancer) he wants to make sure somebody he cares about gets to have the money. So Walt gives him his barrell & they get the other barrels from the Nazi storage & Walt collapses & dies from his cancer or possibly gunshot from the firefight, knowing Jesse will have money to start a new life. Jesse adopts Brock & they ride off to start a new life in Mexico or Canada or something...As for the White family...I think Gretchen & Elliot will take care of them financially. I think the ricin is probably for either Gretchen & Elliot or Lydia but more likely Lydia. Although without Gretchen & Elliot there's no financial security for the White's. Or maybe Jesse will send them money from Mexico from time to time. I think also possibly Hank could've had life insurance from the DEA & maybe it was worth a few million? She would def take care of Skylar & company....I think Walt definately wants to clear up the issue about Grey Matter though to the world....Oh well, I can't wait a whole week!!!!!

cpjackson79
cpjackson79

Hey great review!  Thanks for pointing out the several alternate endings.  It makes perfect sense.  Killed off the big bad guy: check.  Retires and walks away from it: check.  Condemned to die in solitude: check.  But now the real ending is upon us, and we have no idea what's going to happen.  

vrcplou
vrcplou

I'm still betting that Walt comes back to smote everyone, including Jesse, Gretchen and Elliot and he either gets taken out by/with Jesse or he gives himself the ricin.  Jesse can't live with the knowledge of the things he's done and the deaths he's caused; to have him live would be the ultimate cruelty. And all the "dog" references to Jesse this season; ultimately he is the loyal dog who's reached the end and gets put down.  I think everyone dies.    But who knows? 

I will say that I was thrilled to see a happy cast photo in Time's Emmy coverage.  The unrelenting bleakness of these final episodes has been difficult and seeing the cast happy and smiling is a timely reminder that however over-involved I am in the world of Walter White, the beloved actors still go on!

joenamherst
joenamherst

Sorry avalanchryder you don't get a spoiler warning for a show that went off the air FIVE YEARS AGO!!!

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

@TimePoster Rah!

I have said they burned valuable minutes in The Granite State they could have used being themselves, rather than turning into self-destructive auteurs, leading to, most notably, a The Sopranos-type ending.

This writer is now watching the AMC replay. Very cool. The show can stand many watchings.

If they hadn't broke bad as storytellers, like with Granite State , they could have gone more James Bond with Lydia coaching Czech assassins how to get rid of the Nazis in a final showdown.

Gilligan says 90 percent could hate it and 10 percent could like it, the ending. With Granite State as a set up, it looks like a 90 percent will hate the ending.

Yeah, I can dig Dante's Inferno, and ice, and Mr. Magnorium's, but isn't it the prime directive of a story teller to convey action rather than thought?

 out




MarkTroha
MarkTroha

@acen1999 

Well stated!  Best comment made by anyone watching Breaking Bad.

EmAnnett
EmAnnett

@Cat15 But Skyler doesn't know anything about her except that Walt said she wanted him to go back and cook meth?

AlisonPetrie
AlisonPetrie

@cthom2384 Gray Matter is worth around $2 BILLION - no way in hell Walt could become the majority shareholder with his $80 MILLION.  Seriously, do some math. 

olduck
olduck

@spr217 This blog is well worth reading. Great insights!

guru.niinja
guru.niinja

@d.j.bradleylike Antonio responded I'm alarmed that you can get paid $7422 in 1 month on the computer. more JOBK3 COM

Sinisterwaltz
Sinisterwaltz

@Nuts He wakes up next to Louis, Malcolm, Reece and Dewey.  That was his name right dewey?  well it worked for the finale of the bob newhart show.  

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

@DennisFlynnIII  That sounds like it. I think Walt wants to poison Gretchen and Elliot. Remember there was a little fuss at their lavish birthday party with everyone asking the White's what they wanted to drink. Anna Gunn was taking crap from Walt about drinking while pregnant. As you say, a classical fight to the finish with guns blazing.

Heck, the geniuses at AMC are replaying the whole series starting, I think, tomorrow. That will be cool. I have forgotten so much.


out


NoreenProvost
NoreenProvost

@DennisFlynnIII I imagined an ending like that too. Walt killing the Nazis, Lydia gets the ricin & Jesse getting the money from Walt and (I was hoping before last night's episode that he would take off with Andrea and Brock) now taking off with Brock.

Though now I think the ricin may be for Gretchen & Elliot. Skylar will probably get off because they don't have any real evidence on her.

SlightlyAnnoyed
SlightlyAnnoyed

@joenamherst No-one expects to have one show spoiled while reading about another.  It was totally unnecessary on the part of the author.  The guy told everyone the ending to an entirely different series... it makes no sense.   

vrcplou
vrcplou

@joenamherst I haven't seen The Shield either and I'm planning to Netflix it - but I managed to just pass over the paragraph without being spoiled!!  But yeah, you can't expect secrets to be kept 5 years post-reveal.

SeriouslyAnnoyed
SeriouslyAnnoyed

@joenamherst Sorry Mr. Bigshot. I guess you've seen every single show ever aired. Why do you think people sign up for netflix? so they can watch shows the never heard of or missed because they were at a different place in life when it aired. You are ignorant and lack insight.