Oscars 2014: The Internet Loved Ellen, Selfies, Kerry Washington’s Unborn Child

Conversation on Twitter was nearly 100% positive when it came to this year's Oscars host

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Tim Boyle / Getty Images

Oscar statuettes are displayed on Jan. 23, 2004, at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois

At last night’s Oscars ceremony, the unspoken winner was Twitter — and the winner of Twitter was Oscars host Ellen DeGeneres.

Even if her sunny take on the Academy Awards got some critical demerits for being bland, social-media data put together by the research company Fizziology shows that Twitter conversation about DeGeneres’ hosting gig was pretty unanimously (as in 99%) positive, and her opening monologue scored marks nearly that high. Basically, nobody had anything bad to say about her — or if they did, they kept their comments to themselves.

On the other hand, those who did like her and her stunts were very vocal: more than three-quarters of all the people tweeting about the Oscars during the broadcast were talking about her record-breaking selfie — and the volume of conversation jumped 3,000% in the selfie-centric moments around 10:00 pm. (The second-most-vocal group was comprised of people who thought Leonardo DiCaprio should have won.)

(MORE: Oscars 2014 Recap: 12 Years a Slave Is King, and Lupita Nyong’o the Princess Bride)

Meanwhile, over at Google, people who wondered how many times he’s been nominated (answer: this year makes four acting nods) made that question one of the most-asked Oscars-related queries during the broadcast. The only ones that were more popular than that were:

  • Who presented with Matthew McConaughey?
  • Who is Jennifer Lawrence dating?
  • When is Kerry Washington due?
  • What is Dallas Buyers Club about?

So, to save time for those of you who haven’t joined the searching hordes yet, here are your answers: Kim Novak, of Vertigo fame; X-Men co-star Nicholas Hoult; “Spring,” says TVLine.com; and a real HIV-positive Texan man who smuggled experimental drugs into the U.S. for AIDS patients.

You’re welcome.