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Breaking Bad Watch: Say Hello to My Little Friend

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Ursula Coyote / AMC

“Just get me home. I’ll do the rest.” –Walter White
“I guess I got what I deserved.” –Badfinger, “Baby Blue”

The final episode of Breaking Bad, like Walter White climbing into that frozen car in New Hampshire, had a lot of business to take care of in a short time. To list just a few of the questions hanging before it: Will Walt die? Will he be redeemed? Can he make it up to his family? What is Marie’s role? What is the ricin for? The machine gun? Does Gray Matter fit in? What happens to Skyler? Where’s the Todd and Lydia story going? Oh, and is Huell still waiting in that living room?

“Felina,” the last episode ever of the magnificent series Breaking Bad, was a kind of machine gun of narrative, knocking down all of those questions with auto-fire efficiency. (Well, almost all. Sorry, Huell!) It was not flashy. It wasn’t structurally ambitious, in the way other Breaking Bad episodes have been. It was not, in most respects, surprising. (Except for Walt’s laundering scheme with Gretchen and Elliott, I think I saw nearly everything predicted, at least in general terms, by people besides me in the last week.)

And that’s OK. Because what “Felina” was–as effective, satisfying series finales are–was true. It was true to the five seasons that preceded it, true to Walter White’s obsessions and pride, and true to what Breaking Bad is at heart: a Western. As in the song “El Paso,” the protagonist (I’m not going to say hero) rode back to town, faced his enemies, said his goodbyes, and died. A Western is meant to go out with a bang, and Breaking Bad went out with about 40 of them per second (plus a dose of ricin).

It’s a Western, though, in which we were following the man, literally, with the black hat. Having seen the trail of suffering Walt has selfishly left behind him, I didn’t necessarily want to see Walt end up triumphant, feeling like a hero. But as I wrote when this final run of episodes began, the definition of a “good” Breaking Bad finale was not whether it punished Walter White. It was whether the series stayed true to his character, to its themes, whether or not it was pleasant to see.

On that level, “Felina” was a good finale. I wouldn’t call it a great episode, in the way that “Ozymandias” instantly was. But it closed out a great series in style, with visual flair, action, and a thorough lack of phony redemption.

For let’s not be mistaken: Walt solved a lot of problems in this finale, but that’s not the same as saying that he made everything better. We saw Walt back in Heisenberg mode, ending his problems and his enemies with DaVincian invention and Machiavellian manipulation. He devised a way to get his money to his family, like it or not; he delivered Skyler, literally, a ticket out of jail (albeit a lottery ticket); he MacGyvered the destruction of the Nazi fortress and freed Jesse; and he poisoned Lydia with Huell-like dexterity.

But was it a redemption? Did Walter White set everything straight and turn himself back into a good man before he went out? He didn’t, and I think he knew he didn’t–nor did he necessarily want to. Breaking Bad, over five seasons, turned Mr. Chips into Scarface (right down to the machine gun); to turn him back into Mr. Chips in one hour would have been a cheat.

Instead of redemption, Walt ended with something like peace. He knew what he was, and he was done lying, to himself and to others. The key moment probably came in his talk with Skyler: “If I have to hear one more time that you did this for the family–” she begins. “I did it for me,” he says. “I liked it. I was good at it. I was alive.”

We can argue about this, but I will say that this is not a good thing: that the self-actualization of a middle-aged man is not a good enough excuse to go selling death on the streets. But it is who Walt is, and he is not going to say otherwise anymore. It is not a temporary thing that he can retire from; he knows that now.

In fact–and this upends the moral closure you often expect from TV stories–he is not really sorry about it, even if he regrets some of the consequences. He is this guy; he may be a druglord with a code, but he is still a druglord. And he is going to go out on his terms, achieving a victory the way he defines it: not because it is right, not because it is the motion of a just universe–notwithstanding the car keys dropping from heaven–but because he is good at it. He is the bad guy out to get the worse guys. Is it Justice? It’s what Just Is. At least it rhymes.

And “Felina,” in some of its most powerful moments, is also conscious of what Walt cannot engineer. He cannot get his family to love him again. Skyler lets him see his baby Holly one last time, but she does not offer her forgiveness. And he can only take what he knows is his last look at Walt Jr. from a distance, knowing that his son’s last words will be wishing for his death and that he is going off to grant that wish. You don’t have to like Walt to empathize with him here; whether he deserves love, he did once love.

And then he heads off to the showdown with Jack at his compound, where he wins one more time, with ingenuity and science. (He also, maybe fittingly, essentially kills himself; we see him take what look like two gunshots from ricochets as he lies on the floor with Jesse.) His last moments with Jesse, I felt, were one point where the finale fell short. It’s brief and intense, and maybe that relationship is too far gone for there to be any more to it. But at the end of it I felt mostly relief for tortured, manipulated Jesse–not so much that he got free as that, finally, he had a chance to pull a trigger and refused.

But we’re probably past the point where Walter White could have catharsis through an encounter with another person. There are no moving last words, no epiphanic speech for Walt, who instead leaves the world after telling Lydia that she is going to die a painful death of poison for threatening his family. He ends in silence, and alone.

In a way, this ending is sort of ideal–and maybe more complex than the relatively straightforward finale seems. We’ve been talking for weeks about the different camps fans have been in awaiting the ending. Do you want Walt to live or die? Do you want him to triumph or be punished? And you could say, on the surface that this is an ending that plays out ideally for Team Walt, those who wanted to see him win spectacularly. His plans are a success. He watches his enemies defeated, his voice the last they hear. He ends things on his terms. It is over when Heisenberg says it’s over.

But you could see this ending another way, not as an endorsement of Walt and Heisenberg but as simply a clear reflection of him. In the “Talking Bad’ interview after the finale, Vince Gilligan alludes to Walt at the end as being like Gollum in The Lord of the Rings, in the meth lab, reunited with “his Precious.”

It’s an interesting comparison: Smeagol/Gollum was a dual character like Walt/Heisenberg, and he too ended The Lord of the Rings not redeemed–indeed, villainous–yet instrumental in defeating a larger evil nonetheless. Here, likewise, Walt is alone at the end of all things with a beloved, cold thing. He takes a moment to himself, considers his life’s work, and the last things he sees are himself, his machine, and a smear of blood. One more time, he is caressing his baby. He’s alone with what he loves, and what he deserves.

I can’t say that I loved you in the end, Walter White. But I did love watching your story, in all its cold and hard and bloody beauty.

Now one last hail of bullets:

* Walt may have spent the episode trying to right the suffering of his family, but am I the only one who feels really badly for Lydia’s daughter?

* I saw a lot of talk on Twitter right after this episode was done about whether this finale was better than The Sopranos’, or Lost’s, or vice versa. I might write more about that later, but for now, I’d just say that giving this kind of ending to a very different show like The Sopranos or Lost would have been ridiculous. It makes no more sense to me to argue that finales that “answer all the questions” are better than to argue that cubism is better than impressionism, or nonfiction is better than poetry.

* “Elliott, if you’re going to go that way, you’re going to need a bigger knife.”

* While we’re talking about people amassing massive illicit fortunes–I know AMC is a business, and I’m glad that that business gave us five seasons of Breaking Bad, but the hacking up of this episode for commercials was itself criminal.

* “The whole thing felt kinda shady, you know? Morality-wise?” You could just slap that quote right on the front of the DVD box set.

* As I’d said, I wished the episode–and this finale–had given Jesse more of a moment, but the callback to his box monologue from season 3 was really moving.

* And that’s it. Because I wanted to kick off the discussion here–and am not going to be any more insightful if I stay up until 4 a.m.–I decided to err on the side of getting this review done faster. Which means I probably erred on a bunch of other sides too! I’ll update in the morning to correct any egregious mistakes, and don’t be surprised if I write more about this finale in the days ahead.

* Finally, to everyone reading this post, thanks. I reviewed Breaking Bad on and off its first season, and starting reviewing individual episodes in season 2. It’s been fascinating to watch in real-time as this series deepened, grew darker and more audiacious. And it’s been gratifying to see the commenting community that grew up around these posts here. Whether you were reading these posts from the get-go or just came across this one, thanks, and I’ve been glad to have this amazing, terrible experience with you. So for the last time, have at it: no half measures.

226 comments
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abhilodha
abhilodha

I lost interest when he killed Mike.. .Most stupidest action by Walter...The show should come in category of psycho...

sathishzn
sathishzn

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sathishzn
sathishzn

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Upnworld.com
Upnworld.com

This has been such a fantastic series  - It celebrates the power of writers - Walter for all his insane shenanigans becomes a hero while Skylar for all her martyrdom becomes a hated figure! That's the effect of cunning writing!  


Ultimate Dialogue - "You're the smartest man I ever knew but you're too stupid to see that he made up his mind ten minutes ago"


Ozymandias episode is creme de la creme. Even the songs - "Heisenberg" mexican ballad and "we are born we die" in "End times" were so trippy!


 Here's a full review of this genius work - http://upnworld.com/movie/view/id/49/title/Breakin...

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ZakaryShupe
ZakaryShupe

It was better than Lost's ending, Lost shouldn't even be compared with breaking bad, it was good till it got closer to the end and I've never seen the Sopranos so can't comment on that. All in all though, I was very satisfied with the ending of Breaking Bad.

pboo26
pboo26

I was so glad when Hank died. As soon as he wanted to arrest Walt, I wanted him dead, and that bitch Marie. After Walt had paid for all his physiotherapy, they still wanted to arrest him. Ungrateful bastards, deserved to die.

Agitatus
Agitatus

Awesome reviews here.  Nice observations.  Quit take here from my blog: As tragedies go, this one takes the pages of Shakespeare right out of the book and translates directly into cultural North American, and as tragedies go this one also produces what is hopefully the cautionary tale of our time.  Somehow, though, I don’t think it will have the effect that one would think.  Yes there are consequences, but...

Read the rest of my input at: xyvector.blogspot.com

syzygysb
syzygysb

When that tortoise came padding across the desert,  with the head super=glued to its back,  I knew we were in for a wild ride.  I'm just happy it lasted so long. 

jelppis
jelppis

It's also brilliant that he died alongside with the mask, in the lab, like he had done all the cooking the whole time. This way the blue meth legacy and trademark carried on with him, no one else, 'till the end.

-J

Steve_Davies_20912
Steve_Davies_20912

Loved the comment about the NA tag being attached to the keys. Here's another little detail that has probably already been mentioned: the origami swan Walt leaves next to his Dimple Pinch before leisurely leaving for ABQ. Swan song?

I thought the finale was genius. The machine gun gizmo Walt rigged up made me think of some of the s--- the Magnificent Seven guys devised in going up against far greater numbers. Again, Western.

LouiseRussell
LouiseRussell

No matter what others say, this was one of the greatest endings of all times.  Breaking Bad will go in the history books of how to start and end a series. I loved the ending, even though I wanted more. It left me with tears for a bad guy and glad that his soft prayer in the car was answered with the delivery of the car keys. 

ConcubinoDiaz
ConcubinoDiaz

Walt was not killed by anybody. Figuratively and literally. He found his demise with a genius of his own creation.

Mguzzy
Mguzzy

I re-watched the last episode last night. The more I think of it this episode the more I think it could not have gone any differently. Everyone was expecting to see a twist at the end but it ended in the same way as every other season ending. In fact the last season story arc followed the same pattern as other seasons... 

A) Walt starts off in control of his world, 

B) Walt makes some decisions in reaction to certain events and everything goes out of control. 

C) Walt has some kind of epiphany/plan and takes control of the situation on his terms. Its usually prefaced with Walt saying he's "..got things to do." 

This pattern held true with the end of Tuco, and the end of Gus... This season was no different, except that though it marked the end of all the antagonists (Jack, Todd, Lydia) it also marked the end of himself.  Walt knew that so he had to make sure that no one remained before his demise.. besides there being no Season 6 there could be no bad guys sticking around for another season. 

I think I figured out the ending of this one at about the same point in the show as I figured them all out.. and then I just wanted the satisfaction of seeing it happen. For me one of the hooks of this show, is to know what has to happen and then see the course that will be taken to the inevitable conclusion; whether its the exploding wheelchair or the Mercury(II) fulminate. As I thought of potential endings, and what had transpired before I realized: 

A) Walt had to die, it was a major premise of the whole show, and most probably by his own hand in some way. He would not let the cancer take him (think the Shootist). He could get caught in some other kind of crossfire. Say he set up a situation where the Nazi's and the DEA have a shoot out and he dies in that melee (think Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid). Or Jack manages to Shoot him while saying he can give him the money as a stall for time (Think about a billion other westerns that do this scenario). 

B) Walt had to die in the lab, I think that is where the show started.. in the Classroom lab. To me it was satisfying to see Walt's last moment of reflection, around the lab he created before he died. 

So there are not many scenarios that can be worked into those patterns that made this story what it is. 

Lastly- Tell me that the season ending of Dexter and the penultimate episode of BB with both characters looking like lumberjacks is a coincident.. Only Gilligan is not going to let Walt waste away in his Lumberjackian purgatory. Walt gets out and finishes out the show on Walt's term's..  I think there is an "insiders" writers one-up-menship going on there, heh heh.

withaminutetogo
withaminutetogo

Greetings from Australia where we just had the finale available to us on iTunes today, so unfortunately I've joined the discussion a bit late. Excellent review and I agree with most of your points. The ending was satisfying, it was right. Walter White had lost almost - but not quite - everything, and salvaging what the Finale allowed him to from the total wreckage of his life was fitting, in the way he did it, and who he did it too. Personally I adored the Sopranos ending, and I just loved this one too. I never really bought into the cult of the anti-Walter White. I only gave it consideration when around series five Vincent was basically telling people to. But my heart wasn't really in it. There was always a proximate cause for whatever course of action he took, he never exhibited the gleeful sadism of truly evil characters either in the series (Tuco) or known to history. I believe in the finale his humanity which was unquestioningly there, was given space to reassert itself.As for Breaking Bad the creation, what a standard they have set. My life was enriched by its presence and feels diminished now by its ending. As Mary in the comments below wrote "I am not sure that I will miss the idea of a character such as Walt; however, I will miss, and look forward to eventually viewing, another show that is as carefully and ingeniously crafted as this one has been for such a long time."I hope the Studios are listening. Millions of people are dying to give you our money if you can just do more of this. And Lord knows, there must be an embarrassment of riches in the talented writers available.

Esutter
Esutter

I never watched a single episode of Breaking Bad. I watched "Felina" with friends and they kinda filled in the blanks for me while we were watching the final episode. After the telecast, I felt that I've seen each and every episode of Breaking bad. hmmmm....

JT15
JT15

While the entire final episode was less than completely satisfying, the final moments were as close to perfection for me as anything I could have dreamed up.  The way Walt died brought the story to an end almost flawlessly.  Smiling as he passed through the meth lab, admiring the equipment assembly he himself had used to produce a product that had made him a powerful and terrible man.  Pausing to gaze at the shiny stainless steel reactor, I think he sees not his own image, but that of Heisenberg staring back at him. The person he became during his rise from mediocrity and fall into decadence was the same person who made him feel alive, as he admitted to Skylar.  Walt's demise was as much about coming to love this image of himself as any crime he committed. Walt demonstrated his true feelings by reaching out to touch the reactor as if caressing the image with his blood-soaked hand before falling to his death, leaving behind a bloody handprint as evidence of this final gesture of misguided affection.  The song "Baby Blue" could not have been more perfect for this final scene.  Many reviews point out the beginning lyrics "guess I got what I deserved", which are certainly fitting, but I think the best line that sums up what ultimately destroyed Walt are "special love I have for you, my baby blue".

smather2175
smather2175

What nobody seems to have seen is that when Walt flipped down the visor and the keys fell out the keys were attached to a Narcotics Anonymous white keytag. The key tag is the one you get when you 'surrender' and 'join their way of life.' It was such fantastic little detail that no one noticed. The meth king on his last hurrah, going to finish things and surrender gets a white key tag.

Anybody else think that was a cool little detail?

ITUgettgo
ITUgettgo

Anybody who needs to see the "good guys" win and the "bad guys" get a comeuppance is a moral and intellectual child and should go back to watching police procedural shows and Gunsmoke.  The point of any criminal protagonist is to examine the character from his point of view *first* and then to look objectively at the wake(s) his actions leave.  What we personally think of THE character WW is almost (but not entirely) irrelevant. 

MaryBayasud
MaryBayasud

I think that many viewers have expected to have each episode "top" the preceding episodes in terms of excitement and surprises. I thought the finale was very well executed, and yes, heart-pounding. I expect that the  feeling of being on the edge of my seat while watching ANY television or movie will never quite match the jaw-dropping thrill of this series, and, in particular, this last season of Breaking Bad.  To compare Walt to Tony Soprano or another character who engages in criminal activities is to miss the uniqueness of  how the character of Walt evolves from the very beginning of the series to the very end of it. For example, in The Sopranos, the viewer watches a family of characters who appear to have always taken part in violent activities against their perceived enemies. In Breaking Bad, we get to understand Walt's feelings of frustration and failure, and his need to feel good about himself; even if that self-satisfaction resulted from behavior that ultimately destroyed his family and the lives of many others.

I am not sure that I will miss the idea of a character such as Walt; however, I will miss, and look forward to eventually viewing, another show that is as carefully and ingeniously crafted as this one has been for such a long time.



TheodoreTrout
TheodoreTrout

In Walt's defense:

- Consider what Jesse's fate might have been had he not met Walt in episode one. The box scene is really important, as it is the only glimpse we ever get of who Jesse was before he got into meth in the first place. Jesse will never go near the stuff again, and is free to back to woodworking.

- Walt wiped out the entire criminal underworld of ABQ in 2 years, right down to driving the shady lawyer out of town.Coyuld Hank and Steve have done that ?

SpecialK777
SpecialK777

"and he poisoned Lydia with Huell-like dexterity"

You are implying that Walter White "slipped" the Ricin into the Stevia or a Stevia-laced one into the holder.  It was put in the packet holder long before Lydia showed up.  Lydia was very predictable.  Same place, same time, probably the same table.  So putting it there well before she showed up is what happened.  And then he was sitting at the coffee shop bar when she came in so he was making sure it got into the right hands.

imollyqpd
imollyqpd

Am I the only one who was disappointed in the ending? Some things wrapped up too nicely and other big things left hanging. I do not see the episode winning any awards, as I felt no excitement or edge of seat heart beats that I was hoping to feel, like the episode where Gus dies, awesome! Oh well.

Here are a few things I would have liked to see, but these are just opinion things. My personal belief is that an intelligent woman like Skyler would have hidden some money for herself and the kids back when she filled up the storage unit for Walt. He had no idea how much money there was, so she easily could have done it. I would have preferred an ending with her pulling out a key she had hidden somewhere after she heard Walt was dead with a little self-satisfied smile. I heard that Saul was getting a spin-off series, so that would be great, but I do not know if it is true. Also, Jesse could have at least grabbed a bag of meth, Ted's wallet, or something when he left, just a thought, as he has had plenty of time to see life without money. He could have at least looked for the video confession. But, the things left hanging with him are probably just him being Jesse. I also do not feel Walt's family would completely hate him forever, especially not Junior, so I would have left him a gift with meaning and a secret (?) note, not just the money. I would like to have seen more thought go into the watch other than just setting it on a phone booth for continuity. The way it ended, the cops would find the video tape of Jesse's confession and probably dig the money up somewhere, so they would get it all, not very satisfying. I felt sorry for Brock and Lydia's daughter, so sad.  Marie has her job and death benefits from Hank, so she should be okay, still a klepto. So many unanswered questions about Gus, Huell's fate (even he was too smart to fall for Hank's ruse), Grey Matter issue with Walt, Ted, ...  It was an okay episode, but I wanted a death of Gus quality episode. Oh well, good-bye great series! Bring back Saul- find a way to give him a series, maybe Jesse will stop by....

ShaunMacNeil
ShaunMacNeil

It'll be interesting to see how many little Heisenbergs will show up on my doorstep for Halloween this year.  I, for one, am certainly  going to have a Heisenberg-carved pumpkin.  Baddest dude on the planet !

__Heisenberg_
__Heisenberg_

I for one LOVED the finale...which actually played like more of an epilogue- I thought Ozymandias/granite state was the real end. Walt didn't win in the end. He died with his one true love, but at the cost of losing everyone and everything around him. This was his last hurrah, there was no redemption or no "winning" on his part. He simply needed to tie up HIS loose ends. He even tells Skylar he is NOT sorry....He never asked for her forgiveness...he actually has a moment of pure truth and tells her he did for himself and that he liked it. There was no redeeming Walt...but only he could right certain wrongs in his minds eye and in true breaking bad fashion...his science prowess, and a dose of Heisenberg-like-luck, did just that. 

KleontaviusDinoshark
KleontaviusDinoshark

For those who are pondering a deeper meaning of the episode name "Felina" it is from the Marty Robbins song "El Paso, which was playing in the car Walt stole and also the song Walt sang to himself while building the machine gun rig. Felina represents the true love who our hero will "die for". Classic tune and a perfect fit for Breaking Bad. I sort of wonder if Vince wrote the entire series to fit within the plot lines of the song now...


Out in the West Texas town of El Paso
I fell in love with a Mexican girl.
Night-time would find me in Rosa's cantina;
Music would play and Felina would whirl.

Blacker than night were the eyes of Felina,
Wicked and evil while casting a spell.
My love was deep for this Mexican maiden;
I was in love but in vain, I could tell.

One night a wild young cowboy came in,
Wild as the West Texas wind.
Dashing and daring,
A drink he was sharing
With wicked Felina,
The girl that I loved.

So in anger I

Challenged his right for the love of this maiden.
Down went his hand for the gun that he wore.
My challenge was answered in less than a heart-beat;
The handsome young stranger lay dead on the floor.

Just for a moment I stood there in silence,
Shocked by the FOUL EVIL deed I had done.
Many thoughts raced through my mind as I stood there;
I had but one chance and that was to run.

Out through the back door of Rosa's I ran,
Out where the horses were tied.
I caught a good one.
It looked like it could run.
Up on its back
And away I did ride,

Just as fast as I

Could from the West Texas town of El Paso
Out to the bad-lands of New Mexico.

Back in El Paso my life would be worthless.
Everything's gone in life; nothing is left.
It's been so long since I've seen the young maiden
My love is stronger than my fear of death.

I saddled up and away I did go,
Riding alone in the dark.
Maybe tomorrow
A bullet may find me.
Tonight nothing's worse than this
Pain in my heart.

And at last here I

Am on the hill overlooking El Paso;
I can see Rosa's cantina below.
My love is strong and it pushes me onward.
Down off the hill to Felina I go.

Off to my right I see five mounted cowboys;
Off to my left ride a dozen or more.
Shouting and shooting I can't let them catch me.
I have to make it to Rosa's back door.

Something is dreadfully wrong for I feel
A deep burning pain in my side.
Though I am trying
To stay in the saddle,
I'm getting weary,
Unable to ride.

But my love for

Felina is strong and I rise where I've fallen,
Though I am weary I can't stop to rest.
I see the white puff of smoke from the rifle.
I feel the bullet go deep in my chest.

From out of nowhere Felina has found me,
Kissing my cheek as she kneels by my side.
Cradled by two loving arms that I'll die for,
One little kiss and Felina, good-bye.

theotherside
theotherside

Great finale!  The only thing that I wished I could change would be for the last scene to be Jesse and Brock riding off in the desert, away to a new life.

FYI - if you want a Breaking Bad fix for your withdrawals, email theidquiz@gmail.com and put "Breaking Bad" in the subject line to receive a free, unique and very cool quiz.  It is legit and not spam or a virus carrier.  I tried it and loved it.

sathishzn
sathishzn

now its working!! since when is  "b a stard" a swear/vulgar word?? it means son of an illegitimate consummation?? its in the dictionary, like "b i tch"

sandraoopie
sandraoopie

@pboo26  Hank might have needed physiotherapy, but you need psychiatry.  You remind me of one of my co-workers, who, when I told her that all anyone needed to put them off drugs for life was to watch BB, was astonished that I would say that because look at all the money they could make.  Interesting perspective indeed.

Janaina
Janaina

@pboo26

last thing...

I wonder if a robber fired several shots at you, and leave you in a wheelchair for life, making you pooping and pee in a bucket, making u losing your job,  but then the same robber would come back to pay your medical treatment. would u forgive him?

probably yes right?. After all, you would be grateful to him at the end

Janaina
Janaina

@pboo26

r u glad that Hank died?? was hank ungrateful??   Do u really think Walt was  a generous man????   Walt never thought to paid a dime for Hank treatment...  Skyler forced him to do it!!!  Beside that, if wasn't for Walt, Hank never would be shoot.  Hank was a good, decent man. Walt was a monster. He murdered innocent people, tried to kill children, lied non stop from beginning to end, he destroyed his own family. Walt never liked anyone, except himself. Walt never liked Jesse Walt used Jesse for his own interests, as if Jesse was a puppet. Walt saw Jesse's girlfriend die, and he did not do anything to save her. She died choking on her own vomit.   It amazes me how lot of people see Walt and Jesse as good people and naive.  If the show was real life, Walt and Jesse would be sentence to life in prison and Skyler as well, since she did become Walt accomplice on the drug deal, money laundry, not forgetting she was the one that cause Ted to become disable.

andyfoster99
andyfoster99

I bet you were a BLAST to have along for the viewing.  "wait, who is the lady in the blue blouse and why is this kid staring at her and trying to compliment her?" "how did the homeless looking guy know that she'd be at that coffee shop and use the stevia?" "who is she on the phone with?"  Sigh. 

VailBeach
VailBeach

@Esutter Yeah, think again. 

Watching only the last episode and thinking that having someone "explain" the other 61 hours for you tells you all you need to know is like cutting a hole in the Mona Lisa.  

Steve_Davies_20912
Steve_Davies_20912

@smather2175 It may already be in this thread, but a friend of mine noticed the origami swan at the end of Granite State. Swan song?

d.j.bradley
d.j.bradley

@KleontaviusDinoshark Note: "A deep burning pain in my side." Walt's wound was in his side. What is needed to complete your theory, Mr. Shark, would be Skylar arriving with the paramedics and kissing him goodbye, a much better ending than their very good ending I am sure.

andyfoster99
andyfoster99

how in the world is Jesse going to get Brock?  I've read this several times, and even the actor that played Mike said the same in the "talking bad" right after the show.  But how in the world is Jesse, who's a known accomplise to Heisenberg going to get custody of Brock who is now almost certainly a ward of the state and in an orphanage or foster home somewhere?

pboo26
pboo26

Janaina, don't talk stupid.

sathishzn
sathishzn

@Janaina @pboo26 My full comment is not showing! Why?


Any way...Hank created Heisenberg! Think about it...

spamiam7
spamiam7

@Janaina @pboo26 I agree; I wanted him dead, too. Such a pleasure to watch him go down. I felt the same way about Rita in Dexter.

ReedGcn
ReedGcn

Most retarded thing I've ever heard. Straight up watch the ending of one of the greatest tv shows of all time AND have your friends ruin the rest of it for you, basically making watching the show useless? Idiot.

andyfoster99
andyfoster99

you missed the point then d.j. -- his LOVE was the meth lab.  the science.  Heisenberg!  He died in the arms of his one true love.