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Less Than Accidental Racist: Why Paula Deen’s Comments Insult Her Fans Too

Deen made a pile of money off a certain idea of old-school southern culture. She had an obligation not to embody its most shameful history and attitudes.

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“I can’t, myself, determine what offends another person,” says Paula Deen in the transcript of a deposition for a workplace-discrimination lawsuit that surfaced yesterday. By today, I’m thinking, she might have a better idea.

For instance: admitting that she has used “the N word” (in her and the lawyer’s words)–“of course,” and probably on more than one occasion. Defending telling racial and ethnic jokes: “it’s just what they are, they’re jokes.” And wishing she could plan a “Southern plantation wedding” for her brother, with African American servers in the part of antebellum slaves. (Deen reportedly didn’t go through with that idea because, you know, “the media” would have twisted it into something. Those media! Always turning folks’ innocent plantation-slave parties into something racist!)

The transcript, published by the Huffington Post after initial reports in the National Enquirer, came in a discrimination and sexual-harassment lawsuit by a former employee against Deen and her brother Earl “Bubba” Hiers. The lawsuit’s specific allegations are still being litigated, but Deen’s on-the-record comments–her rationalization of racism maybe even more so than her admissions–could be even more damaging to the southern cook’s empire, built on media and butterfat.

They may not hurt her business at all, of course. Yes, there are reports that Food Network is reacting warily, pledging to “monitor the situation”–which could mean investigating the facts or waiting for public opinion to tell it what to do. Deen, meanwhile put out a not-exactly-apology saying that she “does not condone” racism. But you never know what people will reject, forgive, or ignore in their celebrities. Maybe Deen fans will decide this is all overblown, or that it’s in the past, or that, whatever, they don’t need to admire her character to want the recipe for fried butter balls (Deen’s recent experience with diabetes notwithstanding). Maybe they’ll decide that regardless of the messenger they still like Deen’s message–an unapologetic defense of pleasure and down-home food culture.

And that would be a sad thing. Because Deen’s comments were an insult and injury to her fans as much as everyone else.

After the news broke yesterday, there was a lot of outrage and condemnation. There was sarcasm: Twitter users christened the hashtag #PaulasBestDishes, inventing recipes like “Separate but equal light and dark meat.” But there was also another strain of reaction: Of course. Of course someone like her would say that.

Of course, some commenters snarked, a deep-accented, deep-southern woman of a certain age was a deep-down racist. Of course someone who stood for old-timey culture (and nutritional values) had a Bull Connor-era racial outlook. Of course that redneck lady cooking that redneck food would be a redneck racist. I mean, just look at those recipes! Shouldn’t we all have already guessed that?

Yes, that’s stereotyping in itself. I have eaten too much barbecue and fried okra to actually believe that pork fat chemically induces bigotry; I’ve lived in the north too long to think the south has a monopoly on racism. But the real blame here belongs to Deen, not her critics.

Deen made a pile of money off a certain idea of old-school southern culture. In return, she had an obligation to that culture–an obligation not to embody its worst, most shameful history and attitudes. Instead, in one swoop, fairly or not, she single-handedly affirmed people’s worst suspicions of people who talk and eat like her–along with glibly insulting minorities, she slurred many of the very fans who made her successful. She made it that much harder to say that Confederate Bean Soup is just a recipe.

And in a way, maybe one side benefit of this spectacle is that its forces a conversation about the connections between culture and history. When Brad Paisley released “Accidental Racist” with LL Cool J earlier this year, a lot of people–me included–made fun of the song’s corniness, or critiqued its white-guy self-pity. But Paisley at least was trying to talk, however poorly, about a real thing: the tension between people wanting to retain symbols of their region’s past and people who have a hard time seeing those symbols as innocent nostalgia.

In the case of “Accidental Racist,” the flashpoint is a Confederate flag T-shirt. The narrator sees it as simple southern-rock fandom, now separated from the people who used to fly it in a war to preserve their right to own black slaves. That’s all history–it’s about other people’s “mistakes” from the past–but now it just means you’re a Skynyrd fan. The black man he meets at a Starbucks, voiced by LL Cool J, can’t write it off that easily. You can’t just separate sweet nostalgia from ugly history.

OK, so a deep-fried pickle is not the Stars and Bars. But what’s offensive about Deen’s rhetoric is that she’s using the same kind of rationalization: I’m not endorsing racism, I’m just respecting my past! In a way, her slave-dinner-party idea is uglier even than her “N word” admission, because it’s thought-through sentimentality for a racist system, excused as being about a love for beauty and graciousness. It’s not racism that makes Deen love the visual of a room of black people serving whites in pre-civil-rights-era garb—oh, no! Indeed, she admires their “professionalism”! And yet, when the lawyer asks if she couldn’t achieve the same effect with servers of various races, she answers: “That’s what made it so impressive.”

That’s what made it so impressive. It would be terrible if the takeaway from this incident is that not only is Paula Deen racist, but anyone who sounds and lives and eats like her must be too. That’s the wrong answer, but, as Deen’s antebellum fantasy shows, you also can’t just assume that nostalgia for the culture of an oppressive time can be neatly separated from the actual oppression. Nostalgic culture–for food, customs, decor, symbols–is not automatically an endorsement of the times in which they were born. But it damn sure can be used that way.

And by doing so, in the aw-shucks way she did in her deposition, Deen didn’t just insult black people and Jewish people and God knows who else. She insulted the present-day south and the decent people in it; she insulted the fans who wanted to like her food and TV shows and not be embarrassed; and she insulted the home-and-hospitality culture she purports to stand up for. Yes, food is food, no matter your color or creed. But it doesn’t matter how much butter and batter you coat it in, ugly is still ugly.

542 comments
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Rio
Rio

This is how lawyers "win" cases.  They allow the ignorant public to "hear" it out of context. 

StephenSwain
StephenSwain

Her  best course would be to just totally be quiet.  "You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law..."  She has already blown it.  But every time she opens her mouth to try to explain or qualify or excuse, she digs the hole deeper.  We all know what she did or said was at least inappropriate.  Her thoughtlessness tripped her into saying "of course", as if it were the most understandable thing in the world.  

Paula:  Be silent now for a while.

feekoningin
feekoningin

This article starts with the subhead, "Deen made a pile of money off a certain idea of old-school southern culture. She had an obligation not to embody its most shameful history and attitudes." Is that true? Was that spelled out in her contract? If not, then Deen was only responsible for presenting herself and her products in whatever way she chose -- even if there were risks and consequences, which there are with just about everything. There are plenty of people willing to accept a variety of stereotypes, even with whatever negativity comes with them. Heck, Jeff Foxworthy made a whole career of being a redneck, though he obviously chose to stop short of race baiting. Eddie Murphy and Chris Rock have gotten rich by saying some pretty derogatory things bout white people, and Black people, too. Paula Deen's deposition shows regardless of her personal desire to go back to the good old days, she knew it wasn't possible and that she would suffer consequences if she tried. That is where she made the right choice. She may have wanted a wedding served up by middle-aged Black waiters in crisp white jackets and black bow ties, but she clearly understood this would be offensive and chose to make no effort in that direction. Still, she gets no credit for that. If she actually wanted to present the South as many of us have been taught to remember it, she had every right to do so. Many people, from Jesus Christ to our Founding Fathers, have bucked the status quo to advocate for unpopular ideas. The beauty of being American is that our government can't nail us to a cross for it.


Read more: http://entertainment.time.com/2013/06/20/less-than-accidental-racist-why-paula-deens-comments-insult-her-fans-too/#ixzz2XRx7ttTB

oldbutyoung
oldbutyoung

Those of you who state "black" people use the "n" word all the time are missing the point.   I am "black" and I find the word offensive regardless of who is using it.   It speaks to the persons character and demonstrates far more than you're will to give it credit.   It is particularly more offensive when it comes from someone working in the public with the ability to reach a large number families.   Deen has established herself as a role model of a mom, cook, and wife.  The FoodNetwork hired in that role.   I agree with their decision to fire her.   Her character is now tarnished.  She is only regretful now that the offense has been made public.   I feel there is a level of tolerance and acceptance that I am suppose to live with.   I find it all  inacceptable and intolerable.  That is my right and no one should expect me to do otherwise.  Yet, here it is.  Find a way to get over it.  I'm supposedly envious because Deen is wealthier than me.  No, I am not envious.  I am looking at her character and her role on television and believe she had a greater responsibility in her role modeling.   In accepting this character means I have to accept what I find inacceptable.   I can not and will not do that.  Deen can maintain her character.  No one is asking her to change.  She has to live with herself, but that does not mean, I have to find her acceptable and will not support her.  Can I forgive her?  Sure I can.  But she should suffer the consequence of her actions.  The firing was appropriate.  I hope QVC views her character and comes to a determination as well.



pitythefool
pitythefool

A woman goes to work and has a male business owner.  He at times calls women in general another word for prostitute.  He makes  jokes using that word in the workplace.  He asks some of the women at the job if they would like to make a little extra money by serving at his guy's night poker party but the women would be required to wear tight short skirts, plunging necklines, and high heals so they look the part because he thinks it would be impressive.   When he is faced with a discrimination lawsuit his defense is that he doesn't know what offends people.  When the discrimination lawsuit is made public and the male business owner who is also affiliated with a major well known organization is released from his contract with them as they feel his words and actions do not properly represent their organization and would actually hurt their organization.  I am curious what everyone's opinion of this scenario is.

creolemeauxjeaux
creolemeauxjeaux

Paula Deen is being sued only because SHE is 'white' and is smart enough to make her own money . 'Black'  people use the 'n' word all of the time and of course are NOT sued for it . Plantation movies are made with 'black' actors as slaves and are NOT sued . Are 'black' people ashamed of their past ???   'white' peoples have been enslaved in the past also and are not ashamed of it . Can people just make their own money and not try to 'legally'  steal it from someone else .  

lshb
lshb

Everyone makes mistakes...At least she is owning what she said/did...But on another note, Why is it only publicized when a black person is called the "n" word or something is said to them racially, but it is okay for them to make racist remarks about white people...Everyone has the same rights now, so everyone should have the same responsibilities...You can't call white people racist slurs (comedians or not) and then play the racist card when someone else says something about you....I am not racist, I love all people, and I do not see color...What I do see is ignorance...But for once, I would like people to admit it is both sided, and it has nothing to do with slavery...because slavery was abolished in 1865...Was slavery a HORRIFIC thing, yes...But, it has been several generations since then...Everyone has equal rights, so for GOD SAKE treat EVERYONE the same...If don't want to have racial remarks said to you, don't say them to someone else...

ctyjewski
ctyjewski

The very reasoning for WHY should used the N-word demonstrates her racism.  In other words, when one is emotional/upset one is more likely to say things without thinking and demonstrate one's belief structure; a lack of understanding of how things like, for example, racist jokes and/or a "plantation wedding" are offensive merely confirms what her emotional fraught discourse exposed in very bald detail.  She is apologizing for being caught with her hand in the proverbial cookie jar and not for actually going for that cookie (because she sees nothing wrong with eating that cookie -- pardon all the puns).  Those that excuse her behavior should probably check themselves because their defense demonstrates that they are no different from Dean  -- an unapologetic racist.  Thank you, Poniewozik, for writing such a clear discussion of the subject matter.

pitythefool
pitythefool

The N word is off limits.  Can we just agree on that?  If you hear other people using it, they are wrong.  If you hear people of whom that term refers to using it, they are wrong.  If you use it, you are wrong.  If you are a comedian and you use it, you are wrong - you may still be funny but you're wrong.  If you are a pro athlete and you use it, you may still be great at your sport, but are wrong.  If you are a rapper and you use it, you may still have a cool jam but you are also wrong.  If you are an employer who has a legal responsibility to create a safe and comfortable work environment and you use it you are wrong.  But, not only are you wrong but you are legally liable should someone you employ feels compromised in the safe and comfortable work environment you are legally obligated to provide.  If you represent an organization and you use the N word and that organization feels your use of the N word harms their brand then they have the right to terminate you.  You want to sit on your front porch with a cool pitcher of spiked lemonade with your close like-minded friends and spout off N jokes, F jokes, J jokes, etc... you are all wrong but it's a far more suitable place to get it out of your system.

Bvoissem
Bvoissem

This is spot on for how I read her deposition.  The "N" word is offensive enough.  The idea that she wanted middle-aged black men in shorts and white jackets, "tap dancing" around serving wedding guests (but you know, she didn't go through with it because the media would be all over her - just not her own conscience) is just freaking appalling.  And the worst thing to me?  It's the number of people I know -- good friends -- who support her.  They say she "just made a mistake" and "a sincere apology should be accepted and she should be given a second chance".  Except her "sincere apology" came very recently, and her wedding idea was as recent as 2007.  Her answer to whether she used the "N" word?  Immediate.  And on several occasions.  And she's not sure what others find offensive.  So I guess that means that a straight person can call a gay person a slur, or a thin person can call a fat person a pig, because how are we to know what offends someone else?  Sick, sick, sick.  Glad she is off the air.  Wish I didn't know how my friends felt though.

jazzyme
jazzyme

Paula Deen's use of the "N" word sickens me, but her explanation and attempt to justify her use of it sickens me more. If you read what she said in her deposition, Paula glorifies her experience in visiting the  Southern restaurant and experiencing an atmosphere reminiscent of slavery days. She goes so far as admiring the crisp white tuxedo jackets against the wait staff's dark skin. Her recollection of this dining experience was almost orgasmic for her. That's the problem. Who would marvel about a restaurant because it had minority waiters  dressed stereotypically in order to create a certain atmosphere reminiscent of a time period in America History that was extremely hurtful and degrading to a particular group of people? The fact that Paula Deen would not recognize the offensive, demeaning nature of  her comments, if ridiculous! Furthermore, her wanting to recreate that same restaurant vibe for her brother's wedding is inexcusable.


 A mistake is forgetting cancel a meeting with your employee. A MISTAKE IS NOT calling your employee a racist slur.  No big deal is burning the meatloaf, so the family has to go out to dinner. NO BIG DEAL IS NOT saying you'd love to have "N" waiters, but you can't because the media would make a big deal about it. 

The bottom line is, all you people saying Paula "made a mistake" and "its no big deal" suffer from the same disease as Paula....and as with Paula, hidden racism is just like a clogged toilet: its bound to spill out eventually.

coop
coop

The following is for some of the people who is still a supporter of Paula Dean that insist that the N-word is not insulting to Black people when used by White people so I copied and pasted this bit of information for her Jewish supporters.  PLEASE READ CAREFUL BECAUSE SOME PEOPLE ONLY CARE ABOUT WHEN THINGS ONLY EFFECT THEM PERSONALLY. It is to know that when a person is a racist that they are not only a racist toward just black folks but to people of all colors and religion that is different from their own.  Most people don't always know the definition of a racist, especially when they come  from the South so I felt the need to let all the people of color and different religious folks that she is not only making those derogatory remarks against only blacks but you too>>>>>>>>>

 The National Enquirer claims to have acquired a video of a deposition in which Deen admits to using the N-word and making racist and anti-semitic jokes. She also allegedly describes her interest in hiring black waiters dressed to look like "slaves" at a wedding.

JEdmund
JEdmund

The PC police are running amok.  Animal Farm lives....

DianaMaras
DianaMaras

This whole situation is so stupid. She is one woman who represents herself and no one else so why do people insist on caring? She doesn't represent white people. She doesn't represent women. And she doesn't represent the South. She ONLY represents herself. Caring about what stupid people think is in itself stupid. 

RichardAnthonyThompson
RichardAnthonyThompson

If you know that using the "N" word is wrong, then why do you feel the need to use it. In today society with an African American President and professional hard working African American who are working in a professional environment. Why do you need to use this word? Why do you feel the need to use this degrading word? There is no place for this world in today society. She could not talk to this person directly and try to find a base for them to settle their disagreement. People say that you can't teach an old dog new tricks. Sorry, but you are not a dog, Humans have the ability to learn, adapt and change.

Why is so hard that you can not use this word. Are you uneducated that you can't stop yourself from using this word. I am an African American professional and I never use the "N" word. Are you saying that anyone over 60 years old learn? You do not have the mental will power to stop saying or using the degrading "N" word from your vocabulary.

IF you know that using profanity offends people, then you have the mental ability to stop using that word. This is not a hard task for an educated society that have the ability to pay bill online. to drive a SUV, to pay your taxes, vote and have a major TV show on a cable network. She doesn't have the mental ability to refrain using the "N" word. This is crazy.

Individuals from all parts of the USA and including the South, A person who make southern cooking and has a TV show, that person can not refrain from using that word. this is ridiculous. I have no respect for her or other people who know better. In the great melting pot of American citizens, when one group is hurting and degraded, then all of Americans are hurting too. American needs to take a personal stand and say ”I am not going to use the “N” word.” If we do not take a stand, then no one will stand and try to fight the evils which destroys American unity.

There is no define reason to use this word in any social/political setting. If a person can not have a direct conversation with an African American person and try to understand one another, then they will use the “N” word to degrade them as a person. When I was in college, someone took a key and scratched the “N” word into the side of my car. I was very hurt.

The only thing I can do is pray that people like Paula, Dog (bounty hunter), George Zimmerman or pizza deliver drivers will learn that using “N” word or using racial stereotypes to put down individuals has unforeseen actions that has not only destroyed them but also destroys other lives.

JoeMonte
JoeMonte

I never used the word, and I'm 71.  I've had associates who have used the word in conversation with me.  That was my way of knowing they were bigots.  Now lets talk about another word, M------F-----.  I find this term outrageously slanderous, offensive, and insulting.  However, I don't believe that any words should be censored.  I believe in the First Amendment.  We now have the C word the P word the F word the S word the B word the S word the CS word, and I don't know how many others.  Is there a dictionary of words we can't use?

JoeMonte
JoeMonte

What is the N word?  Nincompoop?  Neanderthal?  Nonsense?  When I was a kid it was, "Sticks and stones will break my bones, but names will never hurt me".  We had free speech back then.

sweet100.wow
sweet100.wow

It was recent, recent, recent! Not just 30 years ago.  It is on going and lives in here heart. That is why  it is a problem.  Not only did she use the "N" word but she obviously embraced the hatred in how she used the word when she lashed it out on the person she did recently.  It is deeply rooted in her.  The fact that she also considered having all black servers dress as slaves at a southern wedding dinner is insulting to blacks and those that still struggle with the affects that previous racism and current racism still has on those of color.  Some people like to say blacks are so sensitive.  Well, some would be considering the obstacles they have faced and continue to face. America has come a long way, however we live in a society where racism exists but not as blatant as it was in the past.  Meaning in the past you could do or say what ever you want to a black person and Jim Crow supported it.  Now you dare better now say anything or do something obvious, because you will be exposed.  I myself at the age of 38 experienced racism a few times.  Sometimes it was blatant some times it was subtle.  There are companies where racism exist and unless you have the power, time, and money to fight against it you don't.  And for the record I will say there are probably some blacks in positions that now do the same.  Anyone that understands apologies.  She said she was sorry but she did not truly apologize. The Food Network made a wise decision to protect its image.  Yes, we have all said and done something we we regretted, but it's like any job.  Be professional! 

I do want to address the use of the "N" word by blacks.  It is common in some black communities (NOT ALL) that the "N" word is used by blacks towards other blacks.  Let me help you understand something about black culture.  Until you understand a culture you won't always understand the "why's" of that culture.  

You have to first realize that many blacks grew up being called the "N" word either by a white person or by people in their communities.  Why?  When blacks were in slavery they were called the "N" word and that is also how they were taught to identify themselves.  In many black communities it was also understood to be defaming of one when called that. Not all slaves or blacks knew or understood the negative connotations associated with the word and throughout the generations it was passed down in some communities as acceptable.  It is offensive to some blacks when whites use it because it is a word that was often expressed in hate and reminds many people of repressive times of blacks.  It is a word that was used in not just to identify or categorize someone, but often to disgrace someone.  It was used in hate.  No one wants to be hated. That is why many blacks do not like it when a white person uses the word.  The "N" itself has formed many definitions.  Some of those definitions breed hate and disrespect. 

When some blacks use it casually it .  Yet even in many black communities the "N" word has been used to put someone down.  That is a result of a racist system they were born into, not a system they created in the black community.  Many blacks use the "N" word in ignorance, not understanding the struggle many blacks have come through and to come away from the use of that word that often represented a time of no respect for blacks.  To the young man you spoke to that said using the "N" word to another black person showed respect.  In some communities that might be true for them, but it is not the truth for the majority.  I also bet you that same young black man, would use that same "N" word in a negative way that is disrespectful and degrading.  Thus proving that the "N" word is a dirty word.  So, I would encourage anyone that uses that word to stop using it.  

It's not good for any race to use the "N" word.  It was not accidental.  It was intentional and it was disrespectful.  For anyone to use the excuse that some blacks use it is a poor one.  It is sad that they use it because it is disrespectful coming from anyone.

It's just bad business, farewell Paula!!!  


ancopisu
ancopisu

..." He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her"...

JilliLabomb
JilliLabomb

America deserves better than Paula Deen #Paula does't share your dream

JethroBodeen
JethroBodeen

"Of course" everyone who grew up in the 50's or 60's in the south has used the N-word and heard an ethnic joke.  Why is this news?

Should we deny our past, and lose the lessons we have learned?

lcn24
lcn24

So, according to you and your interview just on CNN, basically all cooks/chefs that  cook Southern style food are racists? Roots of all this cooking goes back to slavery; yeah, makes a lot of sense.  Obviously, you have a real grudge against Ms. Deen for some reason.

SukeMadiq
SukeMadiq

What has 4 legs, runs fast, and says "Ho de do, ho de do"? 



Oops wrong forum.

REIGNXXX
REIGNXXX

Really Paula???

We live in a racist society , there's no excuss. I'm sure your not the only person to use the N -word nor cook  food with high a fat content that you  wouldn't eat.

If you said it once you will say it agian again and again and again...

 I  wonder who ese  you've spoke to? The  real problem is think what you want but use your month eat.

I love the food network! but revenues are important.. , tell them you slipped on a hamhock., will  adopt a child from Africa and give to the  church ,write a book and all is forgiven.

sacredh
sacredh

"I can’t, myself, determine what offends another person,” says Paula Deen"

Shorter version: I'm clueless. 

chdouglas058
chdouglas058

As a person who has lived in the south most of my life, I have heard black americans calling each other that word numerous times, more so among themselves than any white person.  So I asked one young man why they called each other that.  He told me it was a sign of respect and that you had to use an "a" at the end instead of an "r" at the end of the word.  I asked him how he would react to me saying it, as I am an Irish/Scot American.  He said that would be offensive. 

 I am sure we have all said something that we have regretted, however firing her for saying something 30 years ago?  What a stretch.  I am sure her restaraunt will in Savannah will do just fine, as people like her food she prepares, not her personal opinions.  Sounds like Food Network was looking for an excuse, and they found one. 

TerrriP
TerrriP

Clicked the wrong link and read this article, sorry didn't mean to give it a false accreditation, I mean opinion.  I'm searching for an article based on facts and I found one based on opinion. Continue on, I'll look elsewhere. Should have known better than to click on any link for TIME. I'll search Fox News, where I should have looked to begin with to get the FACTS and let me reach my own non biased opinion. After all, that is why God game ME a brain.

kww
kww

Seriously...if she had come out and said something against Gays or the LGBT community in general no one would have a problem with her getting sacked...that is the only group you can insult these days and lose a job, show or respect over.   Moreover the Feds consider slander against the LGBT community a hate crime.  No other community has that sort of "enforced" protection.  Otherwise the jails would be full of rednecks, lol.  But the fact that here attitude and hateful remarks were justified  by her upbringing is ridiculous.  There is no excuse.  And if remember this all came out when an former black employee sued her for creating a hostile race baited work environment.  That argument could be used to justify hate against the LGBT community as well...but most thinking people will see through that one.  I think good riddance and I for one am glad FN took a decisive stand.  My dad was a chef and my parent from the south and there was never an excuse for hateful talk...we traveled the world and had friends from all nationalities.

GrayLiddell
GrayLiddell

In the last 50 years haven't the goal posts been moved all the way down the field when it comes to the definition of 'racist'?It used to lean more toward the idea of 'government reg or law defining one group as lower than the other' as in 'You sit in the back of the bus'. Then the goal posts were slowly moved over 50 years to where now the definition of racist now is merely 'noticing race' is you are white, especially in a critical vein. Other groups can 'notice race' with impunity,especially if it is critical of the (former?) majority, due to the tacit minority clause of debate in public forums.There is a double standard when it comes to noticing race in  the public forum.

We do not have Nixon like recordings of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in their offices but I think it very likely they used this forbidden word on many occasions while they were President. Given the new rules of 'racism' shouldn't we revamp their reputations downward?

DeVonThomas
DeVonThomas

She didn't just say the word 20+ years ago.  She has admitted saying this word in her restaurants.  She can't give the context in which she has used the word however.  The plantation theme using all black servers was just too much.  She made her bed, now she has to lie in it.  She obviously has issues with some black people, and have no issues with calling  them the N word if it fits her mode of what that is.