Have a Question About Online Etiquette?

Your queries answered by the man who (literally) wrote the book on manners in a digital world

  • Share
  • Read Later
Getty Images

If you’re reading this, you’re connected to the Internet. Which makes it likely that you’ve been offended by—or have offended someone else with—poor online manners. (It’s also likely that many might finds such “offensive” behavior to be perfectly normal.)

There are many resources for resolving matters of etiquette—the New York Times recently highlighted the etiquette gurus of YouTube—but there’s still one name that, to many, remains the ultimate authority: Emily Post. And, on April 16, her great-great-grandson, Daniel Post Senning, is stepping up to the plate with a new book called Manners in a Digital World: Living Well Online.

As with past Post tomes, the book takes readers through the rules of well-heeled behavior—but this volume, written by the webmaster of emilypost.com, focuses on the realms of our digital world: social networking, blogging and online communication.

(MORE: 10 Unwritten Laws of Web Etiquette)

We’ll be talking to Senning about his book next week—and have been offered a chance to pose a few etiquette-related questions of our own. And we’re letting you in on the discussion.

What obscure rule of internet behavior do you not fully comprehend? What do you do correctly online, that nobody else seems to understand?

Ask in the comments, via Twitter or on Facebook, before Monday Apr. 8, and we’ll try to get your question answered.

4 comments
Flavio.
Flavio.

To my mind, being conected or being on line, this means that it is not our real life, so we are turned into an icon, where as the real life is talking to people looking into their eyes as they look into our eyes, so we act in real life, rather than being in the internet is the opposte of real life, but what i don't make out = don't understand is the bizzare attitudes that they take toward to each others, like for example when someone is conected and is shown that she or he is really conected and they are told hello! How are you doing? In the end things like that, and we are not responded, and even later on the other opportunities when they reconect on the internet, so the status is not yet responded, i would understand that on the first time that when they were greeted and for some reason they disconected off the internet and they didn't have yet seen the status, but later on the internet the answer about the status was already there responded. But thinking psychologycally we're dealing with people, so in other words different behaviours. 

Dunsfordthe3rd
Dunsfordthe3rd

what i don't understand is why people go online, and then expect their opinion to be the only one, and god forbid a different opinion is posted! I have noticed there is rarely any reasonable debate online.  I mean, do people REALLY believe their opinion is the ONLY opinion that is 'correct'? I don't understand why it is so hard to believe that someone with an opposing view could have a valid point... 

Also, people who don't know how to use they're/there/their or your/you're correctly.  did THAT many people skip out on 4th grade?



MelissaMurphy
MelissaMurphy

There is not such thing as online etiquette.  There is no way to enforce such a thing, and not a single attention span long enough to care.  Just try to make someone use the proper form of "your vs. you're".  Not gonna happen.


cloudchasersakonige
cloudchasersakonige

Here's me question.  Why do webmasters keep using slideshows even though most users hate them?