I Admit It: I Don’t Really Like Christopher Nolan’s Movies All That Much

There, I said it

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Kevin Winter / Getty Images

Nolan speaks onstage during the 2012 MTV Movie Awards held at Gibson Amphitheatre on June 3, 2012 in Universal City, Calif.

I just want to start by saying that writing this post was not my idea.

A couple of weeks ago I casually mentioned in an e-mail to my editor that yes, absolutely, they’re fine, but I’ve never really liked Christopher Nolan’s movies all that much. She was so pleased to have discovered that she had such an outlier on her staff that she insisted I write a post about it. Expressing, as it were, my feelings.

I explained that on the Internet writing such a post is referred to as “suicide.” By way of an incentive she aimed a rogue Soviet-era nuke at a basket of fluffy baby chinchillas and told me she wasn’t afraid to use it. And here we are. I’m doing it for the chinchillas.

But I want to be clear: this isn’t a troll. And I’m not saying Nolan’s movies are bad. I’m just going to explain why I, for whatever crazy reasons, don’t happen to enjoy them that much.

(MORETIME’s Review of The Dark Knight Rises: To the Depths, to the Heights)

Though yeah, for a guy who claims not to like Nolan’s movies, I’ve seen a fair number of them. I’ve seen Memento. I skipped Insomnia and The Prestige but watched Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. (Caveat: I watched them on planes, so viewing conditions weren’t ideal.) I saw Inception.

Why did I watch them? I watched them because Nolan’s pictures look gorgeous. That cool blue-steel color palette. The iconically composed frames. The effortlessly integrated CGI. His soundtracks are great. His movies look and sound—from a distance—like exactly the kinds of movies I like. They practically smell good.

And also—obviously—he’s ridiculously smart. He has incredible ideas for movies. They are genuinely original and weird. As somebody who tinkers with plots in his spare time, I remember watching Inception with the certain knowledge that I would die without having come up with a premise anywhere near that good. If I had a lot of money and somebody came to me pitching those movies, I would say, yes, make those movies. Here, take my money. Take it all.

So what is my damn problem with Nolan’s movies?

(MORE: Holy Bat Trivia!: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Batman)

First, and least important, is that I can’t watch his fight scenes. For such an unconventional thinker he has a weirdly ultra-conventional way of shooting them. As soon as the action starts he immediately moves his camera in slightly too close and starts jump-cutting every few seconds, as though to make absolutely sure you have no idea where anybody is in relation to anybody else, and how one move leads into the next, so there’s no possibility that you’ll become excited about what you’re watching. I just want to see people hitting each other! Is that so wrong? (There are exceptions—like a few bits of the justly famous zero-grav fight scene in Inception. Just not enough of them for me.)

Second, there’s something funny about how his movies are set up structurally that I can’t quite hang with. They always seem to have a few extra acts tacked on to them at the end. (Major spoilers for The Dark Knight and Inception follow.) Take the plot of The Dark Knight. I felt like it ended at least three times: after Dent becomes Two-Face; after the Joker gets arrested; and then again after Batman defeates Two-Face. Because I am old and have a short attention span, my mind was wandering by about the two-hour mark. Yes: Heath Ledger’s Joker is the best piece of character-acting of the decade. I’m completely there (though I wouldn’t compare him to Milton’s Satan). But for me there was just too much plot for one movie.

The third thing is the way Nolan puts his characters together, emotionally. His movies are incredibly sophisticated in almost every respect, but there’s something about the way he handles human psychology that feels a bit too simple or literal to me. It irks me. Irks I say.

For example: Batman has a bat-phobia because he fell down a well full of bats. Now I—like a lot of people—have a phobia, and in my (admittedly personal) experience that’s not how phobias work. You get scared, and then what scared you gets twisted around in your subconscious (where things that are too scary to face consciously go) and comes out as something so weird that even you aren’t sure where it comes from. The line between cause and effect isn’t that straight.

(PHOTOS: Dark Knight Rides: The Complete History of the Batmobile)

Likewise one of Nolan’s tics as a plotter is forcing people into making impossible decisions or shocking choices. Like in The Dark Knight, when Batman has to choose between saving Rachel or Dent, or the people on the ferries have to choose whether to blow each other up, or when Dent chooses to waive off the reconstructive surgery. Often this works well, but it’s a chancy game for a storyteller, because—as any psychotherapist will tell you—it’s actually pretty rare for life to boil down to just two options, and Nolan has to kind of play with reality a bit to make it look like it does. Like Dent refusing the surgery…I guess the reason is that he’s mad-I-tell-you-mad (but sane enough that he’s not declared incompetent). But would somebody really do that? And be allowed to? Likewise at the end Batman chooses to not reveal that Dent had turned into Two-Face, and we’re all whoa! He sacrificed himself. But why? Because the city would descend into chaos if we all found out that Dent was bad guy? Because everybody in the city is eight years old and can’t handle reality? It just didn’t ring true to me. Or true enough anyway.

Likewise in Inception Cobb’s wife Mal kills herself and frames her husband for her death to force him to kill himself, so they can be together, whereupon he flees the country, abandoning their children. It’s not that I don’t believe it could be done in real life. Mal sets it up very very neatly, with all the evidence and so on. It’s just that it’s the kind of thing people don’t tend to actually do in real life. They only do things like that in movies. It didn’t feel real to me, it’s just a little too neat and clever. And without that as the emotional engine driving the plot, the rest of the movie felt a bit lifeless to me. Gorgeous, but weightless and a bit unsatisfying. Like (ironically) somebody else’s dream.

(I haven’t given up on the possibility that the whole movie was dreamed by somebody apparently ancillary to the main plot, like maybe one of Cobb’s traumatized children.)

Even the way Nolan sets up the idea that Batman and the Joker are on some level fundamentally the same. I get it—but at the same time it feels just a little bit thin and abstract. Like you could write a philosophy paper about it, definitely, but as the moral crux of the film… I mean, they’re not that similar. The Joker is a nihilistic would-be mass-murderer. Batman is a vigilante who punches bad guys. I am not convinced that there is no distinction there. Or at least, there’s enough of a distinction there that I didn’t feel as agonized as I felt like I was supposed to feel.

(MORE: To Catch a Thief: The Evolution of Catwoman)

I’ll stop, I’ll stop. I’m starting to sound like an asshole even to myself. I realize that these are movies, and that this is how movie-plots work. But the thing is: everything else about Nolan’s movies screams intelligence and sophistication. They are intelligent and sophisticated. There are so many perfect moments in his movies—the Joker’s bank heist in The Dark Knight; Mal’s first appearance in Inception—that I feel bummed out when things start to go thud. It’s like he’s so close, but something’s slightly off in that last decimal place…it’s frustrating.

To me anyway. YMMV.

Maybe I should’ve just let her take out those chinchillas after all.

COUNTERPOINT: Graeme McMillan is a Christopher Nolan fan

49 comments
monzurulbijoy
monzurulbijoy

It really doesn't matter what you think. It doesn't change anything about him. He gave super hero movies a whole new level. Also memento, prestige, following, insomnia,inception are great work of art. He is the best director of the decade.

MeLVaNoaTe
MeLVaNoaTe

- Batman took the blame so the criminals in jail would not get out.  The criminals would have had reasonable explanation to get out of jail since Harvey was also a bad guy.

- Don't get me wrong but you are stupid.  Dom planted the idea in Mal's mind that her world was not real and that death was the only escape.  Even after she came back to reality, she thought her world was not real and that drove her to kill herself since that is the only way to wake up from a dream.  As for Mal telling Dom to kill himself, that was not Mal but Dom's guilty subconscious. He really misses his wife and he subconsciously wants to be with her. I suggest you pay more attention to his movies.  You are not the first though to complain about his fight scenes.

Adam_L
Adam_L

I don't care for Christopher Nolan films either, but mainly because they're full of dumb ideas. Using a machine that clones you over and over and probably killing yourself every time, when the magic trick only really required using the machine a single time ever and just having a handy twin? Hacking every phone in the world to create x-ray goggles? Hanging from a rope to repair your spine, restore lost cartilage and end up stronger than ever? Having a dream within a dream within a dream within a dream (etc.) equals your brain running like a military bunker full of supercomputers to live the equivalent of a thousand years in a few minutes? Disabling a single vehicle in an intersection to cause an entourage of incompetent police to divert their course to the worst of four options where you'll be ready with a rocket launcher to destroy a bunch of vehicles, be confronted by Batman who you will disable but then be captured by a presumably dead cop, be locked up in an office instead of a cell, without handcuffs, and a single guard who you can provoke and capture using a shard of glass from a nearby window, who will then let you out where there will be a prisoner near by with a bomb in his stomach that will blow up in such a way that all the cops are disabled but you can get away...

Jim Stiles
Jim Stiles

That was an honest write-up.  I loved how you mentioned that it felt like The Dark Knight ended three times...that's exactly how it felt to me too and that was too distracting.

It comes down to this:  Some people are just too smart for the rest of us but they

themselves are too dumb to realize that...

Heidi McClure
Heidi McClure

I liked Inception, but I agree that Mal's actions didn't ring true. I kind of liked Memento, but I like Guy Pearce doing just about anything. The Batman movies were meh. Heath was good, I love Liam, and I'm still scared of Cillian Murphy. But Christian Bale seriously gets on my nerves. No interest in seeing the current one.

Godzilla1960
Godzilla1960

Nolan's films are really just very expensive drive in movies (even though drive ins are mostly long gone).  Or perhaps the modern equivalent of 1930s Buck Rogers-type serials.  

They are made for teenage boys and their adult mental and emotional counterparts, delivering a quick rush of adrenalin then easily forgotten.

sandiegoson
sandiegoson

Nolan makes the same mistake all super hero movie makers make. Too much secret identity, not enough super hero. Who cares what the hero does when he's not masked? I don't watch or read Batman to see Bruce Wayne mope around!

Joel McNamara
Joel McNamara

I agree with most of the criticisms of this post: you probably need to set aside, ohh, an extra few hours to at least view Nolan's full body of work before laying out your dislikes. I also feel that in general these points could've been better articulated.

That being said, I'm in the same boat about Nolan's movies: they're exceptionally well-produced and written, but he's surprisingly cardboard-cutout in his treatment of his characters (especially for someone who prides himself on injecting psychological depth into his screenplays).

What's more, his movies, although detailed and engaging, have started falling into a recognizable rut: you go into them expecting them to be a kind of cinematic rubix cube, and let's face it, they almost always are. There's nothing wrong with setting up puzzles for your audience, but when the puzzle starts to become the be-all-end-all of the movie -- especially at the expense of character development -- then you start to come off as just a tad one-dimensional. Throw in Nolan's affinity for Big Dumb Objects (the cloner/teleporter in "The Prestige," the sleep machine in "Inception," the bomb in "The Dark Knight Rises") and you've got what starts to look suspiciously like very familiar territory for each movie.

Finally -- and this is my biggest Nolan peeve -- his filmmaking "style" or storytelling method forces him to craft very context-free, rushed scenes. I could count on one hand the number of true establishing shots used in "The Dark Knight Rises," which is unfortunate, because the film flips back and forth so rapidly between different settings that these are vital, not just so you know what's going on but so that you actually have a chance to acquaint yourself with the mood and atmosphere of a locale. Watch a Mann or Kubrick film: I don't care how loudly you play the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtrack over top all the doom and gloom (choice in musical scores could be another paragraph all on its own), if you can't hold an establishing shot (or any shot), you're not going to have atmosphere. At present, Nolan and his post-production team have the editing rhythm of a reality TV show: the status quo is to rip you from one context free midshot to the next, and the result, while confusing, doesn't exactly help build to the kind of finely-finessed payoff that his (apparent) influences like Mann often yield in their films.

Let me be clear: in the current mainstream director's landscape, Nolan is exceptional. Like this article admitted near the beginning, if you wanted to shovel your life savings over to someone in the industry to make a polished, successful movie, it'd be Nolan. The question is whether he has the ability to transition from what is becoming a heavily processed, increasingly straightforward niche that he's developed into a filmmaker who can craft projects that just don't tick all the pertinent "psychological" and "dark mood" boxes so they can sell to the masses.

Guest
Guest

It was kind of you not to call Nolan's Batman films "pseudo-intelligent". That's the term I would have used. Don't bother to see "The Prestige". More of the same. 

Memento was fantastic though. There's some true originality there. 

June2012
June2012

I agree with you about "Inception." I never got why his wife would want him to die -- it seemed unnecessarily convoluted. 

Neotokyo
Neotokyo

Well, the fact your attention span is equal to that of 4 year old or 88 yr old isn't Nolan's problem. Either get smarter or don't watch his movies. The Godfather movies are 3 or over 3 hours long, and they're regarded as some of THE BEST MOVIES of all time. I obviously YOU TOOK the time to write this stupid and pointless article, and no one forced you to do it.  Go watch more movies like "Step Up Revolution", "Snow White and the Huntsman", or "One for the money" and don't crap on Nolan's genuis

Christopher Herman
Christopher Herman

I completely agree with you about the incoherence of the action scenes, although the editors might bear some responsibility for this problem as well, and also Nolan is not as bad as so many other directors nowadays...

 ‎"Batman Begins" was good but it succumbed to Reboot Syndrome, in which the new filmmakers somehow feel obligated to re-tell the origin story instead of starting in the middle with something else interesting. Although "Superman Returns" started in the middle, and it was still lousy. 

I was not one of the more enthusiastic viewers of "The Dark Knight", primarily because Harvey Dent was a doofus: flippant, impetuous, NOT charismatic, lacking in discernment. And there was no chemistry between him and sashaying A.D.A. Maggie Glockenspiel. For Gordon and Batman to then talk about the Joker corrupting "the best of us"...pfft...and for Batman to take the rap and perpetuate a Big Lie...I did not like that ending at all...

I went to see "Rises" on Monday. There is the suggestion by the filmmakers that perpetuating the Big Lie may not have been All That Smart, so the third film kind of wrapped my dissatisfaction with the second one inside out, and slowly worked its way to what I agree was a satisfying ending.

Nicholas A Burr
Nicholas A Burr

This person overthinks movies.  Just relaz and enjoy the show. ..

Beersheva
Beersheva

Not as ridiculously smart as you think. The plot of Inception is based on a Scrooge McDuck comic book. Look it up!

Jackie Jormpjomp
Jackie Jormpjomp

Probably useless trying to get this individual to watch Prestige. Where Illusionist was lush and beautiful and mysterious and romantic, Prestige was edged. It was tragic and very very smart. It was a trick, an often vicious uncompromising one. He wouldn't get it. Nolan is this generation's Hitchcock. His movies are artistically satisfying as they are accessible still by the general public. He is a modern master of the thriller genre, bringing fresh takes and concepts to the screen. He has his own distinct style that is immediately recognizable. He will also continue to be completely ignored by the Academy.

Dennis Oppong Arthur
Dennis Oppong Arthur

Sir, I am a die-hard Christopher Nolan fan, but I must say I really enjoyed your article. I can tell it was straight form the heart. 

And if this is any consolation, I totally see what you are talking about.

Mikaella Clements
Mikaella Clements

Oh man, thank you for writing this. Can Nolan also please come up with a motivation for a male character that isn't "some woman he loved died"? Or have a woman in a film who has a real character arc and doesn't die? Sometimes I get so bored of excusing misogyny because um, excuse you, he's a genius!! Yeah, sure, I can see that: he's also just kind of a douchebag.

f_galton
f_galton

If find the notion that being bitten by a radioactive bat could turn someone into a bat-man with chiropteran abilities preposterous. As someone who has been bitten by a wide variety of radioactive creatures I know for a fact that's not how it works.

Kai Burley
Kai Burley

The whole point of a movie is to live vicariously through the character or to be entertained by a story of an ordinary person put into a fantastic situation. A common fantastic/engrossing situation is if a person has to make a tough decision and they have to choose between two things and what happens because of that choice.

The fact that you find this unrealistic is because it is. How boring would it be if you made someones daily life into a movie? Extremely boring is the answer. These unrealistic situations are exciting because they are rare and not something that you see everyday.

Anyway, glad those chinchillas are safe. And even though I am a die hard Nolan fan, I enjoyed reading your article. Mostly because it was intelligent and it made me think more about his films. So, thank you.

Frank Mondana
Frank Mondana

Nolan didn't even come up with the bat paranoid or the Joker/Batman things. Both were done in other bat-flicks (as well as the comics).

I don't know of many movies where the characters do things like they would for real. That's a basic trope in movies. Even the overly long "art" films have characters do things that nobody would really do. Movies are heightened and/or abstract reality.

Nobody wants to watch real life, it's too boring.

ajjurana
ajjurana

i think the dark knight was great in connecting Harvey dent, joker and the batman together. batman and joker are two sides of a coin. It's like duality. They are essentially the same person except one is an agent of chaos and the other is a beacon of justice. And the 50-50 decisions in the film show the probability of a coin toss. which is the probability Harvey dent and Rachel both had of surviving the bomb..

ajjurana
ajjurana

i think the dark knight was great in connecting Harvey dent, joker and the batman together. batman and joker are two sides of a coin. It's like duality. They are essentially the same person except one is an agent of chaos and the other is a beacon of justice. And the 50-50 decisions in the film show the probability of a coin toss. which is the probability Harvey dent and Rachel both had of surviving the bomb..

WrentheFaceless
WrentheFaceless

At least you're honest about your dislike for Nolan movies

These critics wouldnt get flamed so much if they admitted that, instead of trying to portray themselves as actual honest critics of the movie

Theres nothing the internet hates more than hypocracy

"Dark Knight is terrible, but I'm going to give Battleship a high rating!"

Carney3
Carney3

100% agree on the fight scenes.  I re-watched "Batman Begins" last night and all of them were annoying as hell.  Let us SEE the fight damn it!   It's not just Nolan's issue though -it's everywhere.  "Any Given Sunday" would have been great if I had been allowed to actually follow the action on the field. 

Roger Ebert has been railing against this zoom-in, quick-cut, shaky-cam crap for years, and rightly so.  Yeah you can defend it by claiming it captures the chaos and confusion of a fight but in a real fight you are just as likely to be extremely focused with everything happning in seeming slo-mo.

sean1966
sean1966

Congrats on your honesty. I always felt Dark Knight was two movies, and I thought Batman Begins was kinda slow...but they are still far better than most of the dreck out there. 

And if you want an implausible but truly amazing film, you should go back and watch The Prestige.http://sdanielshortwintercom.blogspot... 

Gabriel Tron Coelho Ferreira
Gabriel Tron Coelho Ferreira

I agree with The Dark Knight being too long. I loved it but thought that was a major defect. I also felt like the movie seemed like it should have ended a half hour before it did. I watched it with my parents in the cinema and they were sleeping at the end. This was because of the joker-barge-building-fight scene which dragged on too much. The thing isn´t that that part of the movie is bad, but that you become desentisized will all the action and get kind of numb. Same thing happens in some Michael Bay movies. As for Inception it was a fantastic work of creativity that sort of lacked a soul. But I love "The Prestige" and think Memento is a fantastic movie. 

Jardin J
Jardin J

I agree with you on the fight scenes, but I disagree about the plot lines being too dense. I feel like most action movies are of the opposite extreme.

Fabian Enders
Fabian Enders

Nolan excels in creating sophisticated and finely structured plots, but its characters exist only to service the plot, and therefore lack real raw emotional depth. That is why you find the films to be lifeless.

msteel271
msteel271

As penance for writing this article, rent The Prestige.  Watch it on a nice TV.  Then come back and thank me.  It may be his best movie and it seems to get the least amount of attention.

lsd265
lsd265

I agree. but I think alot of movies are like that. making the perfecrt movie is hard and there is always something to pick on.

pory
pory

I'm fairly sure the reason why Batman took the blame for Harvey was because revealing the truth would jeopardise Harvey's work -- read, get all the criminals he locked up back on the street. Of course, not wanting to ruin his public image was a big part of Batman shouldering the blame, but yeah, it wasn't quite that superficial. 

...And I think you more or less explained *why* Bruce developed a phobia/fear of bats: it struck something in his subconscious. In his mind, bats represented fear itself, hence he uses it as his costume to scare crooks. He needed to conquer bats to conquer fear...the fact that they were bats wasn't especially important, I don't think. 

Nice to read someone decently explaining why they don't like Nolan's films, so thank you for giving us a different perspective. I actually agree with you on Mal (seemed a bit convenient to me too), but I can get past it and just enjoy myself. And his films are beautiful to look at, so that helps.

Eduardo Aguiar
Eduardo Aguiar

The things you said about the choices, at least with Dark Knight movie are all based om comic books. He didn´t came out with this plot, he just made the look more real but they are exactly how it ended on hq´s.

Casey Courter
Casey Courter

"It’s just that it’s the kind of thing people don’t tend to actually do in real life. They only do things like that in movies. It didn’t feel real to me, it’s just a little too neat and clever"

I guess this is where I started to have an issue with the review.  I do agree with the author in parts and applaud you for the intricate review, yet I don't think either of these movies were intended by Nolan to make you feel like they could happen in real life.  They are most obviously fiction.  If the fact that it didn't seem realistic turned you away, I don't think it's a problem with the fake murder setup scene by Nolan in Inception, but rather the whole plot line.  People hacking into other 's dreams is something, "people don't tend to actually do in real life".

Benjamin Wood
Benjamin Wood

It's hard to give this post weight when you skipped Prestige (Nolan's best non-batman work) and only watched the previous two Bat-films on an airplane. You're right, the fight scenes probably don't have as much impact when viewed on a 4-inch screen with a glare from the window and a stewardess asking you every 10 minutes if you want more coffee. 

sunny james toppo
sunny james toppo

this guy doesn't like Nolan movies because he cant handle action!!!!

given the fact that TDK  and BB were superhero movies, the emotional content in those movies was surprising.. compare them to other  batman or any other superhero movie..

you really did write this article for the chinchillas...

really??? TIME..????

crocostimpy
crocostimpy

I have to agree with you about Dark Knight. I thought the movie was too long. Or maybe it just felt too long because it kept seeming like the main story was being wrapped up. I don't understand why everyone always puts more than one villain and accompanying storyline in the Batman movies. I have been waiting for a really good Dent/Two-Face movie for quite a while. Looks like I'll keep on waiting.

The Prestige is on my list of Very Good Movies. The story develops very well and there's a good twist at the end. A couple of twists actually, but it doesn't seem to me to be too much in one movie.

DonaldOprie
DonaldOprie

@monzurulbijoy  Actually, it doesn't matter what YOU think. The article author is writing in Time. Not only do you have laughable taste in movies, but you can't even write plain, grammatical English. Hope this helps.

Jason
Jason

yea, no offense but you've confused Nolan with Michael Bay.

DonaldOprie
DonaldOprie

@Joel McNamara  lol @ "full body of work"

Jim Stiles
Jim Stiles

"you probably need to set aside, ohh, an extra few hours to at least view Nolan's full body of work before laying out your dislikes."

Says who?  People that can't comprehend a man's opinion based on several movies he did see?  Why does he have to see every one of them?  I didn't feel his critique was off because he didn't watch The Prestige or whatever else he missed.  The writer was spot on.  Movies are meant to entertain us, not to confuse us or distract us from that entertainment.  It's supposed to be fun, not a damn test.  When many audience members leave a spectacle of entertainment shaking their heads in confusion, someone failed at the drawing board...

Jason
Jason

err Spiderman.

SmallSpeakHouse
SmallSpeakHouse

I agree. If characters did nothing but normal everyday things, there'd be no story. Which is why I think many movies should be watched with a degree of suspended realism, so they can be enjoyed. Barring movies that are supposed to be a true representation of society, documentaries, and the like of course.

But hey, to each their own. Everyone has their own way of perceiving things. No different for movies.

On another note, I have to agree with the article about the fight scenes though, they seem a bit all over the place for me.

ThusBloggedAnderson
ThusBloggedAnderson

Yes, "The Prestige" is the Nolan movie for people who don't like Nolan movies. He's working off a novel, which probably helps his storytelling. And it's just damn good.

Nathan
Nathan

"this guy doesn't like Nolan movies because he cant handle action!!!!"

Did you even read the article?!?  He never says he "doesn't like Nolan movies" he says he doesn't like them all that much, as in as much as a lot of people.  

The only statement he makes regarding the "action" is, "First, and least important, is that I can’t watch his fight scenes. For such an unconventional thinker he has a weirdly ultra-conventional way of shooting them. As soon as the action starts he immediately moves his camera in slightly too close and starts jump-cutting every few seconds, as though to make absolutely sure you have no idea where anybody is in relation to anybody else, and how one move leads into the next, so there’s no possibility that you’ll become excited about what you’re watching. I just want to see people hitting each other! Is that so wrong?"

FIRST and LEAST IMPORTANT... out of the three main reasons he stated for not being a huge fan is the way he films his "FIGHT SCENES", not his action scenes... "HIS FIGHT SCENES" and even then it isn't that important to him.  

Nice job of jumping to conclusions!!!  For future reference I would suggest reading an entire article before questioning TIME's judgement in allowing him to write for them.

Andrew H. Hsia
Andrew H. Hsia

i dont agree. love nolans movies.. some of the best out there

DonaldOprie
DonaldOprie

@Jason  No, he was on the mark with Nolan. How old are you? 17?

crocostimpy
crocostimpy

I see you edited your reply.

I didn't say I didn't like DK. On the contrary. And I'm very much looking forward to Rises. I just thought it felt a little odd. Like I saw the ending to three different Batman Movies.